EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin cippus (stake, post). Doublet of cep.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cippus (plural cippuses or cippi)

 
Funerary cippus from Sidon
  1. A small, low pillar, square or round, commonly having an inscription, used by the ancients for various purposes, as for indicating the distances of places, for a landmark, for sepulchral inscriptions, etc.
    • 1855, Henry Duncan, Autumn:
      [] lodged on the top of an ancient sepulchral cippus
  2. (historical) The stocks.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unclear. Some offer connection with Latin Scipiō and Ancient Greek σκήπτω (skḗptō) from Proto-Indo-European *skāp- < *skeh₂p- (rod, shaft, staff, club), whence also Latin scāpus, scamnum, and English shaft.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cippus m (genitive cippī); second declension

  1. stake, post
  2. gravestone, tombstone
  3. landmark, boundary marker
  4. (military, in the plural) bulwark of sharpened stakes
  5. menhir

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cippus cippī
Genitive cippī cippōrum
Dative cippō cippīs
Accusative cippum cippōs
Ablative cippō cippīs
Vocative cippe cippī

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • cippus”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cippus”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cippus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • cippus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • cippus”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cippus”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin