See also: Post, POST, pöst, pøst, post., and post-

English edit

 
Wooden posts.
 post on Wikipedia

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old English post (pillar, door-post) and Latin postis (a post, a door-post) through Old French.

Noun edit

post (plural posts)

  1. A long dowel or plank protruding from the ground; a fencepost; a lightpost.
    ram a post into the ground
  2. (construction) A stud; a two-by-four.
  3. A pole in a battery.
  4. (dentistry) A long, narrow piece inserted into a root canal to provide retention for a crown.
  5. (vocal music, chiefly a cappella) A prolonged final melody note, among moving harmony notes.
  6. (paper, printing) A printing paper size measuring 19.25 inches x 15.5 inches.
  7. (sports) A goalpost.
    • 2010 December 29, Chris Whyatt, “Chelsea 1 - 0 Bolton”, in BBC[1]:
      But they marginally improved after the break as Didier Drogba hit the post.
  8. A location on a basketball court near the basket.
  9. (obsolete) The doorpost of a victualler's shop or inn, on which were chalked the scores of customers; hence, a score; a debt.
    • 1600, Samuel Rowlands, The knauve of clubs:
      when God ſends coyne,
      I will diſcharge your poaſt
  10. The vertical part of a crochet stitch.
Derived terms edit
Terms derived from post (noun) "a dowel"
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb edit

post (third-person singular simple present posts, present participle posting, simple past and past participle posted)

  1. (transitive) To hang (a notice) in a conspicuous manner for general review.
    Post no bills.
  2. To hold up to public blame or reproach; to advertise opprobriously; to denounce by public proclamation.
    to post someone for cowardice
    • 1732, George Granville, Epilogue to the She-Gallants, line 13:
      On Pain of being posted to your Sorrow
      Fail not, at Four, to meet me here To-morrow.
  3. (accounting) To carry (an account) from the journal to the ledger.
    • 1712, Humphry Polesworth [pseudonym; John Arbuthnot], “Of John Bull’s Second Wife, and the Good Advice that She Gave Him”, in Law is a Bottomless-Pit. [], London: [] John Morphew, [], →OCLC, page 18:
      You have not poſted your Books theſe Ten years; hovv is it poſſible for a Man of Buſineſs to keep his Affairs even in the VVorld at this rate?
  4. To inform; to give the news to; to make acquainted with the details of a subject; often with up.
    • 1872 March 2, “Interviewing a Prince”, in Saturday Review, volume 33, number 853, London, page 273:
      thoroughly posted up in the politics and literature of the day
  5. (transitive) To deposit a payment that may or may not be returned.
    1. (gambling) To pay (a stake or blind).
      Since Jim was new to the game, he had to post $4 in order to receive a hand.
    2. (law) To pay bail.
      to post bail
      • 2022 January 1, Paul Bergman, Sara J. Berman, The Criminal Law Handbook: Know Your Rights, Survive the System, Nolo, →ISBN:
        For example, if the police or court sets bail at $1,000, and a suspect owns a fancy watch worth at least that amount, the defendant may be able to use the watch to post bail.
      • 2010 May 18, David Andrew Schultz, Encyclopedia of the United States Constitution, Infobase Publishing, →ISBN, page 45:
        Because wealthy defendants are better positioned to post bail or provide collateral, the American bail system has been criticized as being biased against the poor.
      • 2006 05, Robert Perry, Dirty Money, iUniverse, →ISBN, page 34:
        Carmen posted a $15,000 bond, and like the other Valenzuelas before her, failed to appear for trial. Morgan's scorecard for case 4: 4.4 pounds seized, 2 Valenzuelas arrested, 1 Valenzuela dismissed, 1 bail jump.
      • 1996, Lee N. June, Matthew Parker, Men to Men: Perspectives of Sixteen African-American Christian Men, Harper Collins, →ISBN, page 201:
        When you post bail, and the case is over, the court system will take 30 percent of that bail which, in this example, will be $3,000 of the original 10 percent that you posted. Hence, you will get $7,000 back.
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Chinese: po
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from Middle French poste, from Italian posta (stopping-place for coaches), feminine of posto (placed, situated).

Noun edit

post (plural posts)

  1. (obsolete) Each of a series of men stationed at specific places along a postroad, with responsibility for relaying letters and dispatches of the monarch (and later others) along the route. [16th–17th c.]
  2. (dated) A station, or one of a series of stations, established for the refreshment and accommodation of travellers on some recognized route.
    a stage or railway post
  3. A military base; the place at which a soldier or a body of troops is stationed; also, the troops at such a station.
  4. (now historical) Someone who travels express along a set route carrying letters and dispatches; a courier. [from 16th c.]
    • (Can we date this quote by Archbishop Abbot and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      In certain places there be always fresh posts, to carry that further which is brought unto them by the other.
    • c. 1590–1591 (date written), William Shakespeare, “The Two Gentlemen of Verona”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act I, scene iii], line 152:
      I fear my Julia would not deign my lines,
      Receiving them from such a worthless post.
    • 2011, Thomas Penn, Winter King: Henry VII and the Dawn of Tudor England, Penguin, published 2012, page 199:
      information was filtered through the counting-houses and warehouses of Antwerp; posts galloped along the roads of the Low Countries, while dispatches streamed through Calais, and were passed off the merchant galleys arriving in London from the Flanders ports.
  5. (UK, Australia, New Zealand) An organisation for delivering letters, parcels etc., or the service provided by such an organisation. [from 17th c.]
    sent via post; parcel post
    • 1707, Alexander Pope, Letter VII (to Mr. Wycherly), November 11
      I take it too as an opportunity of sending you the fair copy of the poem on Dullness, which was not then finished, and which I should not care to hazard by the common post.
  6. (UK, Australia, New Zealand) A single delivery of letters; the letters or deliveries that make up a single batch delivered to one person or one address. [from 17th c.]
    • 2020 November 18, “Stop & Examine”, in Rail, page 71:
      Royal Mail worker Evette Chapman gathered a team of 12 colleagues to deliver post in fancy dress and raise money for a nurses' charity and patients in Musgrove Park Hospital, Taunton.
  7. A message posted in an electronic or Internet forum, or on a blog, etc. [from 20th c.]
  8. (American football) A moderate to deep passing route in which a receiver runs 10-20 yards from the line of scrimmage straight down the field, then cuts toward the middle of the field (towards the facing goalposts) at a 45-degree angle.
    Two of the receivers ran post patterns.
  9. (obsolete) Haste or speed, like that of a messenger or mail carrier.
  10. (obsolete) One who has charge of a station, especially a postal station.
    • 1858, John Gorham Palfrey, chapter IV, in History of New England, volume 1, page 136:
      there he held the office of postmaster, or, as it was then called, post, for several years.
Derived terms edit
Terms derived from post (noun) "position; mail" blog post
Descendants edit
  • Bulgarian: пост (post) (Internet)
  • Chinese: po, PO
    Cantonese: pou1
    Mandarin: pōu
    Min Nan: pho͘
  • French: post
  • Irish: post
  • Italian: post
  • Malay: pos
  • Maori: pōhi
  • Polish: post
  • Portuguese: post
  • Russian: пост (post)
  • Scottish Gaelic: post
  • Spanish: post
  • Swahili: posta
  • Welsh: post
Translations edit

Verb edit

post (third-person singular simple present posts, present participle posting, simple past and past participle posted)

  1. To travel with relays of horses; to travel by post horses, originally as a courier. [from 16th c.]
  2. To travel quickly; to hurry. [from 16th c.]
  3. (UK, Australia, New Zealand) To send (an item of mail etc.) through the postal service. [from 19th c.]
    Mail items posted before 7.00pm within the Central Business District and before 5.00pm outside the Central Business District will be delivered the next working day.
  4. (horse-riding) To rise and sink in the saddle, in accordance with the motion of the horse, especially in trotting. [from 19th c.]
  5. (Internet) To publish (a message) to a newsgroup, forum, blog, etc. [from 20th c.]
    I couldn't figure it out, so I posted a question on the mailing list.
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
Translations edit

Adverb edit

post (not comparable)

  1. With the post, on post-horses; by a relay of horses (changing at every staging-post); hence, express, with speed, quickly.
  2. Sent via the postal service.
Descendants edit
Translations edit

Etymology 3 edit

Probably from French poste.

Noun edit

post (plural posts)

  1. An assigned station; a guard post.
    • 2013 June 8, “The new masters and commanders”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8839, page 52:
      From the ground, Colombo’s port does not look like much. Those entering it are greeted by wire fences, walls dating back to colonial times and security posts. For mariners leaving the port after lonely nights on the high seas, the delights of the B52 Night Club and Stallion Pub lie a stumble away.
  2. An appointed position in an organization, job.
    • 2005, Jesse Helms, “Bill Clinton”, in Here's Where I Stand: A Memoir[2], New York: Random House, →ISBN, →LCCN, →OCLC, page 198:
      As hard as this may seem for some people to understand, my adamant stand in favor of President Clinton leaving his post was not personal.
    • 2011 December 14, Angelique Chrisafis, “Rachida Dati accuses French PM of sexism and elitism”, in Guardian:
      She was Nicolas Sarkozy's pin-up for diversity, the first Muslim woman with north African parents to hold a major French government post. But Rachida Dati has now turned on her own party elite with such ferocity that some have suggested she should be expelled from the president's ruling party.
Derived terms edit

See Etymology 2.

Translations edit

Verb edit

post (third-person singular simple present posts, present participle posting, simple past and past participle posted)

  1. To enter (a name) on a list, as for service, promotion, etc.
  2. To assign to a station; to set; to place.
    Post a sentinel in front of the door.
    • 1839 September, Thomas De Quincey, “Early Memorials of Grasmere”, in Autobiographic Sketches: With Recollections of the Lakes (De Quincey’s Works; II), London: James Hogg & Sons, →OCLC, page 116:
      [I]t might be to obtain a ship for a lieutenant that had passed as master and commander, or to get him "posted"— []
Translations edit

Etymology 4 edit

Borrowed from Latin post.

Preposition edit

post

  1. After; especially after a significant event that has long-term ramifications.
    • 2008, Michael Tomasky, “Obama cannot let the right cast him in that 60s show”, in The Guardian[3]:
      One of the most appealing things for me about Barack Obama has always been that he comes post the post-60s generation.
    • 2008, Matthew Stevens, “Lew pressured to reveal what he knows”, in The Australian[4]:
      Lew reckons he had three options for the cash-cow which was Premier post the Coles sale.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 5 edit

Clipping of post-production.

Noun edit

post (uncountable)

  1. (film, informal) Post-production.
    we'll fix it in post
    • 2013, Bruce Mamer, Film Production Technique: Creating the Accomplished Image:
      Admittedly many of these can be fixed in post, but this may limit your flexibility in other areas.

See also edit

Etymology 6 edit

Clipping of post mortem.

Noun edit

post (plural posts)

  1. (medicine, informal) A post mortem (investigation of body's cause of death).
    • 2010, Sandra Glahn, Informed Consent, page 306:
      I gotta run. Yes, send the kid to the morgue. We'll do a post on Monday.

Anagrams edit

Breton edit

Etymology edit

From Latin postis.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

post m (plural postoù or pester)

  1. pillar; post; pole

Synonyms edit

Catalan edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin postis.

Noun edit

post f (plural posts or postes)

  1. board, plank
  2. shelf
    Synonyms: lleixa, prestatge
Hyponyms edit
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Vulgar Latin postus, from positus.

Noun edit

post m (plural posts or postos)

  1. (military) post

Participle edit

post (feminine posta, masculine plural posts or postos, feminine plural postes)

  1. past participle of pondre

Further reading edit

Cimbrian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Italian posta.

Noun edit

post f (Luserna)

  1. post (method of delivering mail)
  2. post office

Derived terms edit

References edit

Cornish edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

post m (plural postow)

  1. post (method of sending mail)

Related terms edit

Danish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɔst/, [ˈpʰʌsd̥]

Etymology 1 edit

Via French poste m from Italian posto (post, location), from Latin positus (position), from the verb pōnō (to place).

Noun edit

post c (singular definite posten, plural indefinite poster)

  1. post (position, job)
Declension edit
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Via French poste f from Italian posta (stopping-place, post office), from Latin posita, the past participle of pōnō (to place).

Noun edit

post c (singular definite posten, not used in plural form)

  1. post, mail (letters or packages)
  2. post, mail (a public institution distributing letters or packages)
  3. postman (a person carrying letters or packages)
Declension edit
Derived terms edit

Etymology 3 edit

Via French poste f from Italian posta (stopping-place, post office), from Latin posita, the past participle of pōnō (to place).

Noun edit

post c (singular definite posten, plural indefinite poster)

  1. entry (in a budget)
Declension edit
Derived terms edit

Etymology 4 edit

Via Middle Low German post from Latin postis (post, door-post).

Noun edit

post c (singular definite posten, plural indefinite poster)

  1. pump, tap, faucet (an outdoor water pump)
  2. (rare, in compounds) post (supporting a door or a window)
Declension edit
Derived terms edit

Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Middle French poste, from Italian posta.

Noun edit

post f or m (plural posten, diminutive postje n)

  1. Mail.
  2. A mail office, a post office.
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Afrikaans: pos
  • Caribbean Javanese: pos
  • Indonesian: pos
  • Papiamentu: pòst

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from French poste, from Italian posto.

Noun edit

post f or m (plural posten, diminutive postje n)

  1. A location or station, where a soldier is supposed to be; position.
  2. A post, a position, an office.
    Toekomstig Amerikaans president Barack Obama maakt zijn keuzes bekend voor de posten binnen zijn kabinet op het gebied van veiligheid en buitenlands beleid. — President elect Barack Obama makes his choices known for the posts within his cabinet in the area of security and exterior policy. (nl.wikipedia, 12/3/2008)
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Afrikaans: pos
  • Indonesian: pos
  • Saramaccan: pósu
  • Sranan Tongo: postu
    • Caribbean Javanese: postu

Etymology 3 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

post

  1. inflection of posten:
    1. first/second/third-person singular present indicative
    2. imperative

Anagrams edit

Esperanto edit

Etymology edit

From Latin post.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [post]
  • Hyphenation: post

Preposition edit

post

  1. after
  2. behind

French edit

Etymology edit

From English post.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

post m (plural posts)

  1. (Internet) post (message on a blog, etc.)

Anagrams edit

German edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

post

  1. inflection of posen:
    1. third/second-person singular present
    2. second-person plural present
    3. plural imperative
  2. singular imperative of posten

Irish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English post.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

post m (genitive singular poist, nominative plural poist)

  1. timber post, stake
  2. (historical) post, letter carrier; (letter) post; postman
  3. (military) post
  4. post, job (of employment)

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

timber post
letters
military
job

Mutation edit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
post phost bpost
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading edit

Italian edit

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from English post.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɔst/, /ˈpost/, (careful style) /ˈpowst/[1]
  • Rhymes: -ɔst, -ost, (careful style) -owst
  • Hyphenation: pòst, póst

Noun edit

post m (invariable)

  1. (Internet) post (message in a forum)

References edit

  1. ^ post in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Anagrams edit

Latin edit

Etymology edit

From earlier poste, from Proto-Italic *posti, from Proto-Indo-European *pósti, from *pós. Related to pōne.

The accusative is from analogy with ante or inherited like Ancient Greek πρός (prós) with the same metaphor.

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

post (+ accusative)

  1. behind (of space)
    Antonyms: ante, prae
  2. after, since, (transf.) besides, except (of time)

Adverb edit

post (not comparable)

  1. behind, back, backwards (of space)
  2. afterwards, after (of time)

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

References edit

Latvian edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

post (transitive, 1st conjugation, present pošu, pos, poš, past posu)

  1. tidy, clean, adorn
  2. dress up, smarten

Conjugation edit

Mòcheno edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Italian posta.

Noun edit

post f

  1. post (method of delivering mail)
  2. post office

Derived terms edit

References edit

Northern Kurdish edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

post m

  1. skin

Norwegian Bokmål edit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology edit

From Italian posta (in the given sense).

Noun edit

post m (definite singular posten, indefinite plural poster, definite plural postene)

  1. post or mail (letters etc. sent via the postal service)

Derived terms edit

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology edit

From Italian posta (in this sense).

Noun edit

post m (definite singular posten, indefinite plural postar, definite plural postane)

  1. post or mail (letters etc. sent via the postal service)

Derived terms edit

References edit

Old English edit

Etymology edit

From Latin postis (post, pedestal).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

post m

  1. post
  2. pedestal

Declension edit

Descendants edit

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *postъ.

Noun edit

post m inan

  1. fast (act or practice of abstaining from food)
  2. fast (period of time during which one abstains from food)
Declension edit
Derived terms edit
adjective
noun
verb

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from English post.

Noun edit

post m animal

  1. post (message)
Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • post in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • post in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from English post.

Pronunciation edit

 

Noun edit

post m (plural posts)

  1. (Internet slang) post (individual message in an on-line discussion)
    Synonyms: publicação, postagem

Related terms edit

Romanian edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Slavic *postъ.

Noun edit

post n (plural posturi)

  1. fast (period of abstaining from or eating very little food), fasting
Declension edit
Related terms edit

See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from French poste.

Noun edit

post n (plural posturi)

  1. post, position, job, place, appointment, station
Declension edit

Scottish Gaelic edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English post.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

post m (genitive singular puist, plural puist)

  1. post, mail
  2. Alternative form of posta
  3. post, stake
  4. letter carrier
    Synonym: posta

Derived terms edit

Verb edit

post (past phost, future postaidh, verbal noun postadh, past participle poste)

  1. post, mail

Mutation edit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
post phost
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Serbo-Croatian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Slavic *postъ.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pȏst m (Cyrillic spelling по̑ст)

  1. fast, fasting

Declension edit

Slovene edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pȍst m inan

  1. fast (act or practice of abstaining from or eating very little food)

Inflection edit

 
The diacritics used in this section of the entry are non-tonal. If you are a native tonal speaker, please help by adding the tonal marks.
Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nominative pòst
genitive pôsta
singular
nominative
(imenovȃlnik)
pòst
genitive
(rodȋlnik)
dative
(dajȃlnik)
accusative
(tožȋlnik)
locative
(mẹ̑stnik)
pôstu
instrumental
(orọ̑dnik)
pôstom

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English post. Doublet of puesto.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpost/ [ˈpost̪]
  • Rhymes: -ost
  • Syllabification: post

Noun edit

post m (plural posts)

  1. (computing) post

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English post.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

post c

  1. postal office; an organization delivering mail and parcels
  2. (uncountable) mail; collectively for things sent through a post office
  3. item of a list or on an agenda
  4. post; an assigned station
  5. position to which someone may be assigned or elected
    Posten som ordförande i idrottsföreningen är vakant.
    The position as chairman in the sports association is free.

Declension edit

Declension of post 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative post posten poster posterna
Genitive posts postens posters posternas

Related terms edit

Anagrams edit

Turkish edit

 
A lamb post.

Etymology edit

From Ottoman Turkishپوست⁩, borrowed from Persianپوست(skin).[1]

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

post (definite accusative postu, plural postlar)

  1. fur, hide, pelt
    Synonyms: kürk, pösteki
  2. (Islam, Sufism, figuratively, by extension from the pelt used as sitting mat) The position of Sheikhdom in tariqas.
  3. (figuratively) A position, an office, a chair.
  4. (figuratively) One's life; hide, ass, heinie.

Declension edit

Inflection
Nominative post
Definite accusative postu
Singular Plural
Nominative post postlar
Definite accusative postu postları
Dative posta postlara
Locative postta postlarda
Ablative posttan postlardan
Genitive postun postların
Possessive forms
Nominative
Singular Plural
1st singular postum postlarım
2nd singular postun postların
3rd singular postu postları
1st plural postumuz postlarımız
2nd plural postunuz postlarınız
3rd plural postları postları
Definite accusative
Singular Plural
1st singular postumu postlarımı
2nd singular postunu postlarını
3rd singular postunu postlarını
1st plural postumuzu postlarımızı
2nd plural postunuzu postlarınızı
3rd plural postlarını postlarını
Dative
Singular Plural
1st singular postuma postlarıma
2nd singular postuna postlarına
3rd singular postuna postlarına
1st plural postumuza postlarımıza
2nd plural postunuza postlarınıza
3rd plural postlarına postlarına
Locative
Singular Plural
1st singular postumda postlarımda
2nd singular postunda postlarında
3rd singular postunda postlarında
1st plural postumuzda postlarımızda
2nd plural postunuzda postlarınızda
3rd plural postlarında postlarında
Ablative
Singular Plural
1st singular postumdan postlarımdan
2nd singular postundan postlarından
3rd singular postundan postlarından
1st plural postumuzdan postlarımızdan
2nd plural postunuzdan postlarınızdan
3rd plural postlarından postlarından
Genitive
Singular Plural
1st singular postumun postlarımın
2nd singular postunun postlarının
3rd singular postunun postlarının
1st plural postumuzun postlarımızın
2nd plural postunuzun postlarınızın
3rd plural postlarının postlarının

Derived terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Nişanyan, Sevan (2002–), “post1”, in Nişanyan Sözlük

Further reading edit

  • post”, in Turkish dictionaries, Türk Dil Kurumu

Welsh edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from English post.

Noun edit

post m (uncountable)

  1. post, mail
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin postis.

Noun edit

post m (plural pyst)

  1. post, pillar
Alternative forms edit
Derived terms edit

Mutation edit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
post bost mhost phost
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.