EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Perhaps from German or Dutch kloppen (to hit, knock), from Middle Dutch cloppen (to make a clopping sound), of onomatopoeic origin. See also clap.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

clop (plural clops)

  1. (onomatopoeia) The sound of a horse's shod hoof striking the ground.
  2. (slang) My Little Pony-themed pornography

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

clop (third-person singular simple present clops, present participle clopping, simple past and past participle clopped)

  1. To make this sound; to walk so as to make this sound.
    • 1959, Anthony Burgess, Beds in the East (The Malayan Trilogy), published 1972, page 569:
      Robert Loo sat and listened behind his counter, his heart aching, his eyes staring at nothing, while his brothers cheerfully clopped around, occasionally calling to the kitchen, as customers drifted somnambulistically in.

AnagramsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin cloppus.

AdjectiveEdit

clop m (oblique and nominative feminine singular clope)

  1. hobbling; limping

DeclensionEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Hungarian kalap

NounEdit

clop n (plural clopuri)

  1. (Transylvania, Banat) hat

DeclensionEdit