See also: Hoof

English

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Etymology

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From Middle English hoof, hof, from Old English hōf, from Proto-Germanic *hōfaz (compare West Frisian hoef, Dutch hoef, German Huf, Danish hov, Norwegian hov, Swedish hov), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱoph₂ós (compare Sanskrit शफ (śaphá, hoof, claw), Avestan 𐬯𐬀𐬟𐬀 (safa, hoof), possibly Czech, Polish kopyto).

Pronunciation

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  • (US) enPR: ho͝of, ho͞of, IPA(key): /hʊf/, /huːf/
  • Audio (US):(file)
  • Rhymes: -uːf, -ʊf

Noun

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hooves of a horse.

hoof (plural hoofs or hooves)

  1. The tip of a toe of an ungulate such as a horse, ox or deer, strengthened by a thick keratin covering.
  2. (slang, derogatory) The human foot.
    Get your hooves off me!
    • 1929, Robert Dean Frisbee, The Book of Puka-Puka, Eland, published 2019, page 110:
      He is a huge man, six feet four on bare hoofs and composed of two hundred and seventy pounds of solid bone and muscle.
  3. (geometry, dated) An ungula.

Derived terms

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Translations

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Verb

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hoof (third-person singular simple present hoofs, present participle hoofing, simple past and past participle hoofed)

  1. To trample with hooves.
  2. (colloquial) To walk.
  3. (informal) To dance, especially as a professional.
  4. (colloquial, football (soccer), transitive) To kick, especially to kick a football a long way downfield with little accuracy.
    Synonym: boot

Alternative forms

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Derived terms

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Afrikaans

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Etymology

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From Dutch hoofd, Middle Dutch hovet, from Old Dutch hōvit, from Proto-Germanic *haubudą. Doublet of sjef.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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hoof (plural hoofde)

  1. head

Derived terms

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Limburgish

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Middle Dutch hof, from Old Dutch hof, from Proto-West Germanic *hof, from Proto-Germanic *hufą.

Noun

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hoof m

  1. garden (an outdoor area containing one or more types of plants)