English

edit

Pronunciation

edit

Verb

edit

come up with (third-person singular simple present comes up with, present participle coming up with, simple past came up with, past participle come up with)

  1. (idiomatic) To manage to produce, deliver, or present (something) by inventing, creating, thinking of, or obtaining it.
    How can you come up with such brilliant ideas?
    Unless Geoff can come up with the money for that train ticket, he'll be stuck in Des Moines for the weekend.
    • 2022 January 12, Nigel Harris, “Comment: Unhappy start to 2022”, in RAIL, number 948, page 3:
      And now we're waiting for the very same people to establish GBR, drive through urgently needed fares reform, and come up with imaginative and effective train operating contracts...
  2. To reach or overtake.
  3. Used other than figuratively or idiomatically: see come,‎ up,‎ with.

Derived terms

edit
edit

Translations

edit

See also

edit

References

edit