commendable

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English commendable, from Middle French commendable, from Latin commendabilis, from commendare (to commend, intrust to), from com- + mandare (to commit, intrust, enjoin), from manus (hand) + dare (to put).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

commendable (comparative more commendable, superlative most commendable)

  1. Worthy of commendation; deserving praise; admirable, creditable, or meritorious.
    • c. 1596–1598, William Shakespeare, “The Merchant of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act I, scene i]:
      Thanks, i' faith; for silence is only commendable/In a neat's tongue dried and a maid not vendible.
    • 1601, Ben Jonson, Poetaster or The Arraignment: [], London: [] [R. Bradock] for M[atthew] L[ownes] [], published 1602, OCLC 316392309, Act III, scene iv:
      Tuc[ca]. [] Can thy Author doe it impudently enough? / Hiſt[rio]. O, I warrant you, Captaine: and ſpitefully inough too; he ha's one of the moſt ouerflowing villanous wits, in Rome. He will ſlander any man that breathes; If he diſguſt him. / Tucca. I'le know the poor, egregious, nitty Raſcall; and he haue ſuch commendable Qualities, I'le cheriſh him: []
    • 2021 September 8, Phil McNulty, “Poland 1-1 England”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      Gareth Southgate's side had performed with commendable maturity to control Poland and a hostile crowd giving thunderous backing to their team - but it all changed one minute into four minutes of stoppage time.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French commendable, from Latin commendabilis; equivalent to commenden +‎ -able.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kuˌmɛndˈaːbəl/, /kɔˌmɛndˈaːbəl/, /-blə/

AdjectiveEdit

commendable

  1. commendable, admirable
  2. (rare) praised

DescendantsEdit

  • English: commendable

ReferencesEdit