commendable

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English commendable, from Middle French commendable, from Latin commendabilis, from commendare (to commend, intrust to), from com- + mandare (to commit, intrust, enjoin), from manus (hand) + dare (to put).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kəˈmɛndəbəl/
  • (obsolete) IPA(key): /ˈkɒmɛndəbəl/, /ˈkɒməndəbəl/[1]

AdjectiveEdit

commendable (comparative more commendable, superlative most commendable)

  1. Worthy of commendation; deserving praise; admirable, creditable, or meritorious.
    • c. 1596–1598 (date written), William Shakespeare, “The Merchant of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act I, scene i]:
      Thanks, i' faith; for silence is only commendable
      In a neat's tongue dried and a maid not vendible.
    • 1601, Ben Jonson, Poetaster or The Arraignment: [], London: [] [R. Bradock] for M[atthew] L[ownes] [], published 1602, OCLC 316392309, Act III:
      Tuc[ca]. [] Can thy Author doe it impudently enough?
      Hiſt[rio]. O, I warrant you, Captaine: and ſpitefully inough too; he ha's one of the moſt ouerflowing villanous wits, in Rome. He will ſlander any man that breathes; If he diſguſt him.
      Tucca. I'le know the poor, egregious, nitty Raſcall; and he haue ſuch commendable Qualities, I'le cheriſh him: []
    • 2021 September 8, Phil McNulty, “Poland 1-1 England”, in BBC Sport[2]:
      Gareth Southgate's side had performed with commendable maturity to control Poland and a hostile crowd giving thunderous backing to their team – but it all changed one minute into four minutes of stoppage time.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Jespersen, Otto (1909) A Modern English Grammar on Historical Principles (Sammlung germanischer Elementar- und Handbücher; 9)‎[1], volume I: Sounds and Spellings, London: George Allen & Unwin, published 1961, § 5.66, page 170.

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French commendable, from Latin commendabilis; equivalent to commenden +‎ -able.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌkumɛndˈaːbəl/, /ˌkɔmɛndˈaːbəl/, /-blə/

AdjectiveEdit

commendable

  1. commendable, admirable
  2. (rare) praised

DescendantsEdit

  • English: commendable

ReferencesEdit