See also: Dare, DARE, daré, darė, darë, dåre, and даре

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English durren, from Old English durran, from Proto-Germanic *durzaną (to dare), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰedʰórse (to dare), reduplicated stative of the root *dʰers- (to be bold, to dare), an *-s- extension of *dʰer- (to hold, support). Cognate with Low German dören, Dutch durven, Sanskrit दधर्ष (dadhárṣa), but also with Ancient Greek θρασύς (thrasús), Albanian nder, Lithuanian drįsti, Russian дерза́ть (derzátʹ).

VerbEdit

dare (third-person singular simple present dare or dares, present participle daring, simple past and past participle dared or (archaic) durst)

  1. (intransitive) To have enough courage (to do something).
    I wouldn't dare argue with my boss.
  2. (transitive) To defy or challenge (someone to do something)
    I dare you (to) kiss that girl.
  3. (transitive) To have enough courage to meet or do something, go somewhere, etc.; to face up to
    Will you dare death to reach your goal?
    • (Can we date this quote by The Century and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      To wrest it from barbarism, to dare its solitudes.
  4. (transitive) To terrify; to daunt.
  5. (transitive) To catch (larks) by producing terror through the use of mirrors, scarlet cloth, a hawk, etc., so that they lie still till a net is thrown over them.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Nares to this entry?)

Usage notesEdit

  • Dare is a semimodal verb. When used as an auxiliary, the speaker can choose whether to use do-support and the auxiliary "to" when forming negative and interrogative sentences. For example, "I don't dare (to) go", "I dare not go", "I didn't dare (to) go", and "I dared not go" are all correct. Similarly "Dare you go?", "Do you dare (to) go?", "Dared you go?", and "Did you dare (to) go?" are all correct. When not an auxiliary verb, it is different: "I dared him to do it." usually is not written as "I dared him do it.", and "Did you dare him to do it?" is almost never written as "Dared you him do it?"
  • In negative and interrogative sentences where "do" is not used, the third-person singular form of the verb is usually "dare" and not "dares": "Dare he go? He dare not go."
  • Colloquially, "dare not" can be contracted to "daren't". According to the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, "daren’t" is used occasionally in ordinary past time contexts (Kim daren’t tell them so I had to do it myself).
  • Rare regional forms dassn't and dasn't also exists in the present tense and archaic forms dursn't and durstn't in the past tense.
  • The expression dare say, used almost exclusively in the first-person singular and in the present tense, means "think probable". It is also spelt daresay.
  • Historically, the simple past of dare was durst. In the 1830s, it was overtaken by dared, which has been markedly more common ever since.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

NounEdit

dare (plural dares)

  1. A challenge to prove courage.
  2. The quality of daring; venturesomeness; boldness.
  3. Defiance; challenge.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English, from Old English darian.

VerbEdit

dare (third-person singular simple present dares, present participle daring, simple past and past participle dared)

  1. (obsolete) To stare stupidly or vacantly; to gaze as though amazed or terrified. [16thc.]
  2. (obsolete) To lie or crouch down in fear. [16thc.]

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

dare (plural dares)

  1. A small fish, the dace.
    • 1766, Richard Brookes, The art of angling, rock and sea-fishing:
      The Dare is not unlike a Chub, but proportionably less; his Body is more white and flatter, and his Tail more forked.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for dare in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


Crimean TatarEdit

NounEdit

dare

  1. (music) tambourine

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dare

  1. vocative singular of dar

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dare, present active infinitive of , from Proto-Italic *didō, from Proto-Indo-European *dédeh₃ti, from the root *deh₃- (give).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dare

  1. (transitive) to give, to transfer the possession/holding of something to someone else
  2. (transitive) to yield, to bear, to give, to produce, to return

Usage notesEdit

The imperative forms of the second-person singular are compounded with pronouns as follows:

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

dare m (plural dari)

  1. debit

AnagramsEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

dare

  1. Rōmaji transcription of だれ

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dare

  1. present active infinitive of
  2. second-person singular present passive imperative of

LeoneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Dō, Dāre (to give). (This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

VerbEdit

dare

  1. to give

ReferencesEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

dare ? (plural dares)

  1. (continental Normandy, anatomy) belly, stomach

SynonymsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

NounEdit

dare (Cyrillic spelling даре)

  1. vocative singular of dar

SlovakEdit

NounEdit

dare

  1. locative singular of dar

ZazakiEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dɑˈɾə/
  • Hyphenation: da‧re

NounEdit

dare f

  1. tree