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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin concoctiō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

concoction (countable and uncountable, plural concoctions)

  1. (obsolete) Digestion (of food etc.).
    • 1621, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy, Oxford: Printed by Iohn Lichfield and Iames Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 216894069; The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd corrected and augmented edition, Oxford: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, 1624, OCLC 54573970, (please specify |partition=1, 2, or 3):
      , New York Review of Books, 2001, p.260:
      [Sorrow] hinders concoction, refrigerates the heart, takes away stomach, colour, and sleep; thickens the blood []
  2. The preparing of a medicine, food or other substance out of many ingredients.
  3. A mixture prepared in such a way.
  4. Something made-up, an invention.
  5. (obsolete, figuratively) The act of digesting in the mind; rumination.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of John Donne to this entry?)
  6. (obsolete, medicine) Abatement of a morbid process, such as fever, and return to a normal condition.
  7. (obsolete) The act of perfecting or maturing.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin concoctiōnem.

NounEdit

concoction f (plural concoctions)

  1. concoction (mixture)

Further readingEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin concoctiōnem.

NounEdit

concoction f (plural concoctions)

  1. concoction (mixture)