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Etymology 1Edit

From Middle French abatement, from Old French abatre[1]. Equivalent to abate (to beat down) +‎ -ment (the result of).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • (US, UK) IPA(key): /əˈbeɪt.mənt/

NounEdit

abatement (countable and uncountable, plural abatements)

  1. The act of abating, or the state of being abated; a lessening, diminution, or reduction; a moderation; removal or putting an end to; the suppression of. [First attested from 1340 to 1470.][2][1]
    the abatement of a nuisance is the suppression thereof.
  2. The amount abated; that which is taken away by way of reduction; deduction; decrease; a rebate or discount allowed; in particular from a tax. [Late 15th century.][2]
  3. (heraldry) A mark of dishonor on an escutcheon; any figure added to the coat of arms tending to lower the dignity or station of the bearer.[3][Early 17th century.][2]
SynonymsEdit

allowance, assuagement, declension, decline, decrease, deduction, depreciation, diminution, discount, drawback, ebb, evanishment, fading, lessening, lowering, mitigation, moderation, rebate, reduction, remission, settling, sinking, subsidence, waning

AntonymsEdit

accession, accretion, aggrandizement, augmentation, development, dilation, enlargement, growth, increase, increment,

Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English, from Anglo-Norman abatre (to abate) + -ment.[3]

NounEdit

abatement (countable and uncountable, plural abatements)

  1. (law) The action of a person that abates, or without proper authority enters a residence after the death of the owner and before the heir takes possession.[3]
  2. (law) The reduction of the proceeds of a will, when the debts have not yet been satisfied; the reduction of taxes due.[4][First attested around 1150 to 1350.][2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Elliott K. Dobbie, C. William Dunmore, Robert K. Barnhart, et al. (editors), Chambers Dictionary of Etymology (Chambers Harrap Publishers Ltd, 2004 [1998], →ISBN), page 2
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Lesley Brown (editor), The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], →ISBN), page 2
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Philip Babcock Gove (editor), Webster's Third International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (G. & C. Merriam Co., 1976 [1909], →ISBN)
  4. ^ Laurence Urdang (editor), The Random House College Dictionary (Random House, 1984 [1975], →ISBN), page 1
  • The Manual of Heraldry, Fifth Edition, by Anonymous, London, 1862, online at [1]