congregate

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin congregatus, past participle of congregare (to congregate), from con- (with, together) + gregare (to collect into a flock), from grex (flock, herd). See gregarious.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkɒŋ.ɡɹə.ɡeɪt/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

congregate (comparative more congregate, superlative most congregate)

  1. (rare) Collective; assembled; compact.
    • 1605, Francis Bacon, The Advancement of Learning, Book II, Chapter IX:
      With this reservation, therefore, we proceed to human philosophy or humanity, which hath two parts: the one considereth man segregate or distributively, the other congregate or in society; so as human philosophy is either simple and particular, or conjugate and civil.

VerbEdit

congregate (third-person singular simple present congregates, present participle congregating, simple past and past participle congregated)

  1. (transitive) To collect into an assembly or assemblage; to bring into one place, or into a united body
    Synonyms: amass, assemble, compact, bring together, gather, mass; see also Thesaurus:round up
  2. (intransitive) To come together; to assemble; to meet.
    Synonyms: assemble, begather, forgather; see also Thesaurus:assemble

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

congregate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of congregare
  2. second-person plural imperative of congregare
  3. feminine plural of congregato

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

congregāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of congregō