English edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Maori hui.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

hui (plural hui or huis)

  1. (New Zealand) A Māori social gathering or assembly.
    • 1962, Education, volume 11, page 56:
      [] accounts of the proceedings of important huis at which Maori leaders took the initiative in discussing their educational and vocational needs []
  2. (New Zealand, by extension) A meeting to discuss plans held by an organization, especially one that considers itself progressive.
    • 2023, Eleanor Catton, Birnam Wood, page 154:
      Shelley's document hadn't mentioned the billionaire at all, and although Mira had said at the hui that Lemoine used the airstrip frequently, she'd seemed to suggest that the farm was his destination, not his point of departure, whicvh would imply that he was living somewhere else.

See also edit

  • An-hui (etymologically unrelated)

Anagrams edit

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Catalan hui, from Latin hodiē, from hōc +‎ diē (literally on this day).

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

hui

  1. (Valencia) Alternative form of avui
  2. (other dialects) Archaic form of avui.

References edit

  • “avui” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Dutch hoey, from Proto-West Germanic *hwaij (whey).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

hui f (uncountable)

  1. (dated, dialectal) whey [First attested in the late 15th century.]
    Synonyms: wei, melkwei
    Hui is een bijproduct van het maken van kaas.Whey is a side product of cheese production.
    • 1612, Gerbrand Adriaensz. Bredero, “Symen sonder Soeticheydt”, in Kluchten, page 108:
      Wy aten een potje karmelck …, en droncken een toochje huy
      We ate a jar of buttermilk porridge…, and drank a swig of whey
    • 1811, Johannes le Francq van Berkhey, Natuurlyke historie van Holland, vol. 9, publ. P. H. Trap, page 453.
      De melk wordt … verwerkt tot boter, kaas, karnemelk en hui …,
      The milk is … processed into butter, cheese, buttermilk and whey …,

Derived terms edit

Finnish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈhui̯/, [ˈhui̯]
  • Rhymes: -ui
  • Syllabification(key): hui

Etymology 1 edit

Related to Karelian hui. Possibly onomatopoeic, but may also be borrowed. Compare Swedish huj, German hui.

Interjection edit

hui

  1. oh! (an exclamation when scared or startled)

Further reading edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-Finnic *hoi, *hui, from Proto-Finno-Permic *šoje, *šuje.

Noun edit

hui (dialectal, obsolete)

  1. spool, bobbin
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old French hui, from Latin hodiē, from hōc (this) + diē.

Cognate with Occitan uòi, uèi, Catalan hui and avui, Galician hoxe, Spanish hoy, Portuguese hoje and Italian oggi.

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

hui

  1. (archaic except in the compound aujourd'hui) today

Derived terms edit

German edit

Interjection edit

hui

  1. an exclamation of pleasant surprise

Further reading edit

  • hui” in Duden online
  • hui” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Hawaiian edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

hui

  1. club, organization
  2. company, firm
  3. combination
  4. cluster
  5. (music) chorus (refrain)
  6. (mathematics) plus sign

Verb edit

hui

  1. (intransitive) to meet
    A hui hou, mālama pono.Until we meet again, take good care.
  2. (intransitive) to unite, join
  3. (intransitive) to combine

See also edit

Ido edit

Noun edit

hui

  1. plural of huo

Latin edit

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

hui

  1. ho!, my word! (expressing surprise)
  2. ooh!, aah! (expressing admiration)

References edit

  • hui”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • hui”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • hui in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • hui in Ramminger, Johann (2016 July 16 (last accessed)) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016

Mandarin edit

Romanization edit

hui

  1. Nonstandard spelling of huī.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of huí.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of huǐ.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of huì.

Usage notes edit

  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

Maori edit

Verb edit

hui

  1. to gather, congregate, assemble, meet

Noun edit

hui

  1. gathering, meeting, assembly, seminar, conference

Middle English edit

Pronoun edit

hui

  1. Alternative form of he (they)

Niuean edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Polynesian *hui, from Proto-Oceanic *suʀi/ruʀi (thorn, splinter, fish bone), from Proto-Austronesian *duʀi (thorn).

Noun edit

hui

  1. bone

References edit

  • hui” in Tohi Vagahau Niuē (Niuean Language Dictionary).

Northern Sami edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈhuj/

Adverb edit

hui

  1. very

Further reading edit

  • Koponen, Eino, Ruppel, Klaas, Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002–2008), Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[3], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

Old French edit

Etymology edit

From Latin hodiē.

Noun edit

hui m

  1. today

Descendants edit

  • Middle French: hui
  • Walloon: ouy

Spanish edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

hui

  1. inflection of huir:
    1. first-person singular preterite indicative
    2. second-person singular voseo imperative

Tongan edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Polynesian *hui, from Proto-Oceanic *suʀi/ruʀi (thorn, splinter, fish bone), from Proto-Austronesian *duʀi (thorn).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

hui

  1. bone
  2. needle
  3. hand (of clock)

References edit

  • Churchward, C. Maxwell (1959) Tongan dictionary: Tongan-English and English-Tongan, →OCLC, page 234