See also: mėėt

English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle English meten, from Old English mētan (to meet, find, encounter), from Proto-West Germanic *mōtijan (to meet), from Proto-Germanic *mōtijaną (to meet), from Proto-Indo-European *meh₂d- (to come, meet).

Verb

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meet (third-person singular simple present meets, present participle meeting, simple past and past participle met)

  1. To make contact (with someone) while in proximity.
    1. To come face to face with by accident; to encounter.
      Fancy meeting you here! Guess who I met at the supermarket today?
      • 1899, Hughes Mearns, Antigonish:
        Yesterday, upon the stair
        I met a man who wasn’t there
        He wasn’t there again today
        I wish, I wish he’d go away []
    2. To come face to face with someone by arrangement.
      Let's meet at the station at 9 o'clock.
    3. To get acquainted with someone.
      I'm pleased to meet you! I'd like you to meet a colleague of mine.
      I met my husband through a mutual friend at a party. It wasn't love at first sight; in fact, we couldn't stand each other at first!
      • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter I, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, →OCLC:
        Captain Edward Carlisle [] felt a curious sensation of helplessness seize upon him as he met her steady gaze, []; he could not tell what this prisoner might do. He cursed the fate which had assigned such a duty, cursed especially that fate which forced a gallant soldier to meet so superb a woman as this under handicap so hard.
  2. (Of groups) To come together.
    1. To gather for a formal or social discussion; to hold a meeting.
      I met with them several times. The government ministers met today to start the negotiations.
      • 1892, Walter Besant, chapter III, in The Ivory Gate [], New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, [], →OCLC:
        At half-past nine on this Saturday evening, the parlour of the Salutation Inn, High Holborn, contained most of its customary visitors. [] In former days every tavern of repute kept such a room for its own select circle, a club, or society, of habitués, who met every evening, for a pipe and a cheerful glass.
    2. To come together in conflict.
      • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter LV, in Le Morte Darthur, book X:
        Sir said Epynegrys is þt the rule of yow arraunt knyghtes for to make a knyght to Iuste will he or nyll
        As for that sayd Dynadan make the redy
        for here is for me
        And there with al they spored theyr horses & mett to gyders soo hard that Epynegrys smote doune sir Dynadan
        (please add an English translation of this quotation)
      • 1667, John Milton, “Book VI”, in Paradise Lost. [], London: [] [Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker []; [a]nd by Robert Boulter []; [a]nd Matthias Walker, [], →OCLC; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, →OCLC:
        Weapons more violent, when next we meet,
        May serve to better us and worse our foes.
      • 2013 June 7, Gary Younge, “Hypocrisy lies at heart of Manning prosecution”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 26, page 18:
        The dispatches [] also exposed the blatant discrepancy between the west's professed values and actual foreign policies. Having lectured the Arab world about democracy for years, its collusion in suppressing freedom was undeniable as protesters were met by weaponry and tear gas made in the west, employed by a military trained by westerners.
    3. (sports) To play a match.
      England and Holland will meet in the final.
  3. To make physical or perceptual contact.
    1. To converge and finally touch or intersect.
      The two streets meet at a crossroad half a mile away.
      • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter I, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, →OCLC:
        Captain Edward Carlisle, soldier as he was, martinet as he was, felt a curious sensation of helplessness seize upon him as he met her steady gaze, her alluring smile; he could not tell what this prisoner might do
    2. To touch or hit something while moving.
      The right wing of the car met the column in the garage, leaving a dent.
    3. To adjoin, be physically touching.
      The carpet meets the wall at this side of the room. The forest meets the sea along this part of the coast.
    4. (transitive) To respond to (an argument etc.) with something equally convincing; to refute.
      He met every objection to the trip with another reason I should go.
  4. To satisfy; to comply with.
    This proposal meets my requirements. The company agrees to meet the cost of any repairs.
    • 2013 June 22, “Engineers of a different kind”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8841, page 70:
      Private-equity nabobs bristle at being dubbed mere financiers. [] Much of their pleading is public-relations bluster. Clever financial ploys are what have made billionaires of the industry’s veterans. “Operational improvement” in a portfolio company has often meant little more than promising colossal bonuses to sitting chief executives if they meet ambitious growth targets. That model is still prevalent today.
  5. (intransitive) To balance or come out correct.
    • 1967, Northern Ireland. Parliament. House of Commons, Parliamentary Debates (Hansard) House of Commons Official Report
      In this instance he has chosen an accountant. I suppose that it will be possible for an accountant to make the figures meet.
  6. To perceive; to come to a knowledge of; to have personal acquaintance with; to experience; to suffer.
    The eye met a horrid sight. He met his fate.
  7. To be mixed with, to be combined with aspects of.
Usage notes
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In the sense "come face to face with someone by arrangement", meet is sometimes used with the preposition with. Nonetheless, some state that as a transitive verb in the context "to come together by chance or arrangement", meet (as in meet (someone)) does not require a preposition between verb and object; the phrase meet with (someone) is deemed incorrect. See also meet with.

Derived terms
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Terms derived from meet [verb]
Translations
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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun

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meet (plural meets)

  1. (sports) A sports competition, especially for track and field or swimming.
    swim meet
    • 2009, Alexandria Mangas, Janet Hommel Mangas, Oxygen for the Swimmer, Xulon Press, →ISBN, page 91:
      Everyone has to experience their first swim meet. They have to get through their first race, their first DQ (disqualification), and their first miss/scratch of an event. Like all swimmers, my first swim meet was nerve-wracking.
  2. (hunting) A gathering of riders, horses and hounds for foxhunting; a field meet for hunting.
  3. (rail transport) A meeting of two trains in opposite directions on a single track, when one is put into a siding to let the other cross.
    Antonym: pass
  4. (informal) A meeting.
    OK, let's arrange a meet with Tyler and ask him.
    • 2002, George Pelecanos, “Cleaning Up”, in The Wire, season 1, episode 12 (television production):
      You feel me? You use these phones to set up a meet, go to that meet… and talk face to face, period.
    • 2004, Matthew Weiner, “Rat Pack”, in The Sopranos, season 5, episode 2 (television production):
      So what do you wanna do? I wanna be absolutely fucking sure. That's what I wanna do. We arrange a meet. I'll feel him out a little bit.
    • 2012 February 23, Joe Kloc, “The Case of the Missing Moon Rocks”, in Wired[1], →ISSN:
      Rosen assured Cregger that he had left no paper trail in bringing the rock into the States. Pretending to be reassured, Cregger agreed to a location for a meet: Tuna’s, a small restaurant and margarita bar off West Dixie highway in North Miami Beach.
  5. (algebra) The greatest lower bound, an operation between pairs of elements in a lattice, denoted by the symbol .
    Antonym: join
Derived terms
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Terms derived from meet [noun]

Etymology 2

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From Middle English mete, imete, from Old English ġemǣte (suitable, having the same measurements), from the Proto-Germanic *gamētijaz, *mētiz (reasonable; estimable) (cognate with Dutch meten (measure), German gemäß (suitable) etc.), itself from collective prefix *ga- + Proto-Indo-European *med- (to measure).

Alternative forms

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Adjective

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meet (comparative meeter, superlative meetest)

  1. (archaic) Suitable; right; proper.
Derived terms
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Translations
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References

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Anagrams

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Dutch

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Latin mēta.

Noun

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meet f (plural meten, diminutive meetje n)

  1. The finish line in a competition

Etymology 2

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Verb

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meet

  1. inflection of meten:
    1. first/second/third-person singular present indicative
    2. imperative

Anagrams

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Finnish

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Verb

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meet

  1. (colloquial or dialectal) second-person singular present indicative of mennä

Synonyms

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Latin

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Verb

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meet

  1. third-person singular present active subjunctive of meō

Middle English

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Noun

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meet

  1. Alternative form of mete (food)