connotation

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Medieval Latin connotātiō, from connotō (I mark in addition), from Latin con- (together, with) + noto (I note); equivalent to connote +‎ -ation.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

connotation (plural connotations)

  1. (semantics) A meaning of a word or phrase that is suggested or implied, as opposed to a denotation, or literal meaning. A characteristic of words or phrases, or of the contexts that words and phrases are used in.
    The connotations of the phrase "you are a dog" are that you are physically unattractive or morally reprehensible, not that you are a canine.
  2. (logic) The attribute or aggregate of attributes connoted by a term, contrasted with denotation.
    The two expressions "the morning star" and "the evening star" have different connotations but the same denotation (i.e. the planet Venus).

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FrenchEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Medieval Latin connotātiō, from connotō (I mark in addition), from Latin con- (together, with) + noto (I note); equivalent to connoter +‎ -ation.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kɔ.nɔ.ta.sjɔ̃/
  • (file)

NounEdit

connotation f (plural connotations)

  1. connotation