Open main menu

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin connotō (signify beyond literal meaning), from com- (together), + notō (mark).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

connote (third-person singular simple present connotes, present participle connoting, simple past and past participle connoted)

  1. (transitive) To signify beyond its literal or principal meaning.
    Racism often connotes an underlying fear or ignorance.
  2. (transitive) To possess an inseparable related condition; to imply as a logical consequence.
    Poverty connotes hunger.
  3. (intransitive) To express without overt reference; to imply.
  4. (intransitive) To require as a logical predicate to consequence.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

FrenchEdit

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

connote

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of connotar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of connotar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of connotar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of connotar.