literal

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English literal, from Old French literal, from Late Latin litteralis, also literalis (of or pertaining to letters or to writing), from Latin littera, litera (a letter); see letter.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

literal (comparative more literal, superlative most literal)

  1. Exactly as stated; read or understood without additional interpretation; according to the letter or verbal expression; real; not figurative or metaphorical.
    The literal translation is "hands full of bananas" but it means "empty-handed".
    • 1594–1597, Richard Hooker, J[ohn] S[penser], editor, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie, [], London: [] Will[iam] Stansby [for Matthew Lownes], published 1611, OCLC 931154958, (please specify the page):
      a middle course between the rigour of literal translations and the liberty of paraphrasts
    • 2017 January 12, Jesse Hassenger, “A literal monster truck is far from the stupidest thing about Monster Trucks”, in The Onion AV Club[1]:
      Mechanically, operating this hybrid vehicle is sort of a cross between driving a car and taming an animal, which means the movie treats the audience to the sight of a man (pretending to be a teenager) driving a literal monster truck in a field next to a woman (also pretending to be a teenager) riding a horse.
  2. Following the letter or exact words; not free; not taking liberties
    A literal reading of the law would prohibit it, but that is clearly not the intent.
  3. (theology) (broadly) That which generally assumes that the plainest reading of a given scripture is correct but which allows for metaphor where context indicates it; (specifically) following the historical-grammatical method of biblical interpretation
  4. (uncommon) Consisting of, or expressed by, letters (of an alphabet)
    a literal equation
  5. (of a person) Unimaginative; matter-of-fact
  6. (proscribed) Used non-literally as an intensifier; see literally for usage notes.
    Telemarketers are the literal worst.

AntonymsEdit

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TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

literal (plural literals)

  1. (epigraphy, typography) A misprint (or occasionally a scribal error) that affects a letter.
    Synonym: typo
  2. (programming) A value, as opposed to an identifier, written into the source code of a computer program.
    Synonym: literal constant
  3. (logic) A propositional variable or the negation of a propositional variable. Wp

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin litterālis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

literal (masculine and feminine plural literals)

  1. literal

Derived termsEdit

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Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin litterālis.

AdjectiveEdit

literal m or f (plural literais)

  1. literal

Derived termsEdit

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Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

literal (strong nominative masculine singular literaler, comparative literaler, superlative am literalsten)

  1. (of cultures, etc., not of individuals) literate
    Es gibt orale und literale Kulturen.
    There are oral and literate cultures.

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit


IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English literal, from Old French literal, from Late Latin litteralis, also literalis (of or pertaining to letters or to writing), from Latin littera, litera (a letter).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [litəˈral]
  • Hyphenation: li‧tê‧ral

AdjectiveEdit

literal

  1. literal.
    Synonym: harfiah

Further readingEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin litterālis.

AdjectiveEdit

literal m (oblique and nominative feminine singular literale)

  1. literal (exactly as stated)
  2. literal (relating to or composed of letters)

DescendantsEdit

  • English: literal
  • French: littéral

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin litterālis.

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: li‧te‧ral
  • Rhymes: -al, -aw

AdjectiveEdit

literal m or f (plural literais, comparable)

  1. literal (understood exactly as written, without additional interpretation)

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

literal m (plural literais)

  1. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) (programming) literal (value written in the source code)

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • literal” in Dicionário Aberto based on Novo Diccionário da Língua Portuguesa de Cândido de Figueiredo, 1913

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French littéral, from Latin litteralis.

AdjectiveEdit

literal m or n (feminine singular literală, masculine plural literali, feminine and neuter plural literale)

  1. literal

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin litterālis.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /liteˈɾal/, [li.t̪eˈɾal]

AdjectiveEdit

literal (plural literales)

  1. literal

Derived termsEdit

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Further readingEdit


TagalogEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish literal.

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: li‧te‧ral
  • IPA(key): /liteˈɾal/, [lɪteˈɾal]

AdjectiveEdit

literál

  1. literal (exactly as stated)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit