EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English corneille, borrowed from Middle French corneille, from Vulgar Latin *cornicula, from Latin cornus (the European cornel).

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: cor‧nel

NounEdit

cornel (plural cornels)

 
European cornel fruits
  1. Any tree or shrub of the dogwood subgenera, Cornus subg. Arctocrania (syn. Cornus subg. Chamaepericlymenum) or Cornus subg. Cornus, especially Cornus mas, the European cornel.
  2. The cherry-like fruit of such plants, certain of which are edible.
    • 1697, Virgil, “The Third Book of the Æneis”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 403869432, lines 855–856, page 292:
      Cornels, and ſalvage Berries of the Wood, / And Roots and Herbs have been my meagre Food.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

cornel

  1. Alternative form of corner

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

cornel

  1. Alternative form of kernel

WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle English cornel, from Anglo-Norman cornal, a dissimilated variant of cornere.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cornel m or f (plural corneli)

  1. corner
    Synonym: congl

Usage notesEdit

This noun is usually feminine but can be masculine in South Wales.

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cornel gornel nghornel chornel
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “cornel”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies