See also: -corn, còrn, and Còrn

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English corn, from Old English corn, from Proto-Germanic *kurną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵr̥h₂nóm (grain; worn-down), neuter participle of Proto-Indo-European *ǵer- (to wear down), or a substantivized form of *ǵr̥h₂-nós (matured, grown old), from *ǵerh₂- (grow old, mature). Cognate with Dutch koren, Low German Koorn, German Korn, Danish/Norwegian/Swedish korn; see also Russian зерно (zerno), Czech zrno, Latin grānum, Lithuanian žirnis, Persian خرمن (xarman), and English grain.

NounEdit

corn (usually uncountable, plural corns)

  1. (uncountable) A cereal plant grown for its grain, specifically the main such plant grown in a given region, such as oats in parts of Scotland and Ireland, wheat or barley in England and Wales, and maize or sweetcorn in the Americas.
    • 1847, John Mason Neale, Stories from heathen mythology and Greek history, page 115:
      Among the divinities that dwelt on Mount Olympus, none was more friendly to the husbandman than Demeter, goddess of corn.
    • 1867, Karl Marx (Samuel Moore & Edward Aveling, translators), Das Kapital[1]:
      However much the individual manufacturer might give the rein to his old lust for gain, the spokesmen and political leaders of the manufacturing class ordered a change of front and of speech towards the workpeople. They had entered upon the contest for the repeal of the Corn Laws, and needed the workers to help them to victory. They promised therefore, not only a double-sized loaf of bread, but the enactment of the Ten Hours' Bill in the Free-trade millennium.
    • 1909, Johann David Wyss (Susannah Mary Paull, translator), The Swiss Family Robinson, page 462:
      I found that we had nearly a hundred bushels of corn, including wheat, maize, and barley, to add to our store.
  2. (US, Canada, Australia, uncountable) A type of grain of the species Zea mays, maize
    • 1809, Edward Augustus Kendall, Travels Through the Northern Parts of the United States[2]:
      The planting or sowing of maize, exclusively called corn, was just accomplished on the Town Hill, when I reached it.
  3. (UK, uncountable) A grain or seed, especially of cereal crops.
  4. A small, hard particle.
    • Bishop Hall
      corn of sand
    • Beaumont and Fletcher
      a corn of powder
corn (Zea mays)
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

corn (third-person singular simple present corns, present participle corning, simple past and past participle corned)

  1. (US, Canada) To granulate; to form a substance into grains.
    to corn gunpowder
  2. (US, Canada) To preserve using coarse salt, e.g. corned beef
  3. (US, Canada) To provide with corn (typically maize; or, in Scotland, oats) for feed.
    Corn the horses.
  4. (transitive) To render intoxicated.
    ale strong enough to corn one
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French corn (modern French cor).

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NounEdit

corn (plural corns)

  1. A type of callus, usually on the feet or hands.
    • Shakespeare
      Welcome, gentlemen! Ladies that have their toes / Unplagued with corns, will have a bout with you.
SynonymsEdit
HyponymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

This use was first used in 1932, as corny, something appealing to country folk.

NounEdit

corn (uncountable)

  1. (US, Canada) Something (e.g. acting, humour, music, or writing) which is deemed old-fashioned or intended to induce emotion.[1]
    • 1975, Tschirlie, Backpacker magazine,
      He had a sharp wit, true enough, but also a good, healthy mountaineer's love of pure corn, the slapstick stuff, the in-jokes that get funnier with every repetition and never amuse anybody who wasn't there.
    • 1986, Linda Martin and Kerry Segrave, Women in Comedy‎,
      There were lots of jokes on the show and they were pure corn, but the audience didn't mind.
    • 2007, Bob L. Cox, Fiddlin' Charlie Bowman: an East Tennessee old-time music pioneer and his musical family,
      The bulk of this humor was pure corn, but as hillbilly material it was meant to be that way.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

corn (uncountable)

  1. (uncountable) short for corn snow. A type of granular snow formed by repeated melting and re-freezing, often in mountain spring conditions.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Corn (emotion)", Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary. Cambridge University Press.

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cornū.

NounEdit

corn m (plural corns)

  1. horn (of animal)
  2. (music) horn

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish corn (drinking horn, goblet; trumpet, horn; curl), from Latin cornū.

NounEdit

corn m (genitive coirn, nominative plural coirn)

  1. horn (musical instrument)
  2. drinking-horn

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

VerbEdit

corn (present analytic cornann, future analytic cornfaidh, verbal noun cornadh, past participle corntha)

  1. roll, coil

ConjugationEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
corn chorn gcorn
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *kurną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵr̥h₂nóm (grain). Cognate with Old Frisian korn, Old Saxon korn (Low German Koorn), Dutch koren, Old High German korn (German Korn), Old Norse korn (Danish and Swedish korn), Gothic 𐌺𐌰𐌿𐍂𐌽 (kaurn).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

corn n

  1. corn, a grain or seed
    • Hie wæron benumene ægðer ge ðæs ceapes ge ðæs cornes: they were deprived both of cattle and of corn. (Anglo-Saxon Chronicle)
  2. a cornlike pimple, a corn on the foot

DescendantsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cornū.

NounEdit

corn m (oblique plural corns, nominative singular corns, nominative plural corn)

  1. horn (bony projection found on the head of some animals)
  2. horn (instrument used to create sound)

SynonymsEdit


RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin cornū.

NounEdit

corn n (plural coarne)

  1. horn
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin cornus.

NounEdit

Flowers of the European Cornel; Florile cornului

corn n (plural corni)

  1. European cornel, Cornus mas
  2. rafter (of a house)
DeclensionEdit

ScotsEdit

NounEdit

corn (plural corns)

  1. corn
  2. oats
  3. (in plural) crops (of grain)

VerbEdit

tae corn (third-person singular simple present corns, present participle cornin, simple past cornt, past participle cornt)

  1. to feed (a horse) with oats or grain

WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

NounEdit

corn m (plural cyrn)

  1. horn

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
corn gorn nghorn chorn
Last modified on 20 April 2014, at 19:06