Open main menu
See also: Corse and corsé

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French cors, from Latin corpus (body). Doublet of corpus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

corse (plural corses)

  1. (obsolete) A (living) body.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.i:
      that lewd ribauld with vile lust aduaunst / Layd first his filthy hands on virgin cleene, / To spoile her daintie corse so faire and sheene []
  2. (archaic) A dead body, a corpse.
    • 1796, Matthew Lewis, The Monk, Folio Society 1985, p. 214:
      Ambrosio beheld before him that once noble and majestic form, now become a corse, cold, senseless, and disgusting.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kɔʁs/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

corse (plural corses)

  1. Corsican

NounEdit

corse m (uncountable)

  1. Corsican (language)

VerbEdit

corse

  1. first-person singular present indicative of corser
  2. third-person singular present indicative of corser
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of corser
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of corser
  5. second-person singular imperative of corser

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

Pronunciation 1Edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkor.se/, [ˈkor̺s̪e]
  • Hyphenation: cór‧se

NounEdit

corse f

  1. plural of corsa

VerbEdit

corse

  1. third-person singular past historic of correre

Pronunciation 2Edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɔr.se/, [ˈkɔr̺s̪e]
  • Hyphenation: còr‧se

AdjectiveEdit

corse

  1. feminine plural of corso

NounEdit

corse f

  1. plural of corsa

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit