See also: CORS, còrs, and côrs

English

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Noun

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cors

  1. plural of cor

Anagrams

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Catalan

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Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

Etymology 1

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From Latin corsus.

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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cors (feminine corsa, masculine plural corsos, feminine plural corses)

  1. Corsican

Noun

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cors m (plural corsos, feminine corsa)

  1. Corsican (person)

Noun

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cors m (uncountable)

  1. Corsican (language)
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Etymology 2

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From Latin cursus.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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cors m (plural corsos)

  1. privateering campaign
Derived terms
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Etymology 3

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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cors

  1. plural of cor
  2. hearts (card suit)

Further reading

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French

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Latin corpus (body).

Noun

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cors m (plural cors)

  1. Archaic spelling of corps.

Etymology 2

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see cor

Noun

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cors m

  1. plural of cor

Further reading

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Friulian

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Etymology

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From Latin cursus.

Noun

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cors m (plural cors)

  1. course
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Latin

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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cōrs f (genitive cōrtis); third declension

  1. Alternative form of cohors

Declension

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Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cōrs cōrtēs
Genitive cōrtis cōrtum
Dative cōrtī cōrtibus
Accusative cōrtem cōrtēs
Ablative cōrte cōrtibus
Vocative cōrs cōrtēs

Descendants

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References

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  • cors”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cors”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cors in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • cors in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.

Middle English

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Noun

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cors

  1. Alternative form of cours

Adjective

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cors

  1. Alternative form of cours

Old French

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Etymology

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From Latin corpus.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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cors oblique singularm (oblique plural cors, nominative singular cors, nominative plural cors)

  1. body
    • c. 1250, Marie de France, Equitan:
      m'est une anguisse el quer ferue, ki tut le cors me fet trembler
      Such a pain has pierced my heart, that makes my whole body quiver

Descendants

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Old Occitan

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Etymology

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From Latin corpus.

Noun

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cors m

  1. body

Descendants

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Picard

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Etymology

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From Latin corpus.

Noun

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cors m (plural cors)

  1. body

Welsh

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Proto-Celtic *korks; related to Cornish kors (reeds), Breton korz (reeds), and further to Old Irish curchais (reedbed), and perhaps to Latin cārex (sedge).[1] Cameron connects Proto-Indo-European *(s)kerbʰ- (to turn (around), wind), on the basis of Latin scirpus, reasoning that reeds and bulrushes were formerly used to make ropes.[2] However, this root gave Middle Irish corb (wagon(-seat)),[3] making it phonetically unlikely.

Noun

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cors f (plural corsydd)

  1. bog
    Synonyms: mign, siglen
  2. reeds
    Synonyms: cawn, cecs

Derived terms

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Compounds

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Mutation

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Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cors gors nghors chors
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References

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  1. ^ Deshayes, Albert (2003) “kors”, in Dictionnaire étymologique du breton (in French), Douarnenez: Le Chasse-Marée, →ISBN, pages 417-18
  2. ^ John Cameron, Gaelic names of plants (Scottish and Irish): collected and arranged in scientific order, with notes on their etymology... (Edinburgh: W. Blackwood & Sons, 1883), 85.
  3. ^ D.Q. Adams, ‘basket’, Encyclopedia of Indo-European Culture (London–Chicago: Fitzroy Dearborn, 1997), 52–3.

Further reading

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R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “cors”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies