Open main menu

Wiktionary β

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From earlier corse, from Old French cors, from Latin corpus (body). Displaced native Old English lic (whence modern English word lich). The p was inserted due to the original Latin word.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

corpse (plural corpses)

  1. A dead body.
  2. (archaic, sometimes derogatory) A human body in general, whether living or dead.

SynonymsEdit

  • (dead body): For semantic relationships of this term, see corpse in the Thesaurus.
  • (body in any state): For semantic relationships of this term, see body in the Thesaurus.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

corpse (third-person singular simple present corpses, present participle corpsing, simple past and past participle corpsed)

  1. (intransitive, slang, of an actor) To lose control during a performance and laugh uncontrollably.
    • 1993, John Banville, Ghosts
      There were still moments when she would halt suddenly, like an actor stranded in the middle of the stage, lines forgotten, staring goggle-eyed and making fish-mouths...Corpsing: that was the word.

AnagramsEdit