Contents

EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English score, skore, schore, from Old English scoru ‎(notch; tally; score), from Old Norse skor, from Proto-Germanic *skurō ‎(incision; tear; rift). Cognate with Icelandic skora, Swedish skåra, Danish skår. Related to shear. (For twenty: The mark on a tally made by drovers for every twenty beasts passing through a tollgate.)

NounEdit

score ‎(plural scores)

  1. The total number of goals, points, runs, etc. earned by a participant in a game.
    The player with the highest score is the winner.
  2. The number of points accrued by each of the participants in a game, expressed as a ratio or a series of numbers.
    The score is 8-1 even though it's not even half-time!
  3. The performance of an individual or group on an examination or test, expressed by a number, letter, or other symbol; a grade.
    The test scores for this class were high.
  4. Twenty, 20 (number).
    • 1863 November 19, Abraham Lincoln, The Gettysburg Address, based on the signed "Bliss Copy"
      "Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal."
    Some words have scores of meanings.
  5. A distance of twenty yards, in ancient archery and gunnery.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
  6. A weight of twenty pounds.
  7. (music) One or more parts of a musical composition in a format indicating how the composition is to be played.
    • 2013 June 29, “Travels and travails”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8842, page 55:
      Even without hovering drones, a lurking assassin, a thumping score and a denouement, the real-life story of Edward Snowden, a rogue spy on the run, could be straight out of the cinema. But, as with Hollywood, the subplots and exotic locations may distract from the real message: America’s discomfort and its foes’ glee.
  8. Subject.
    • 2005, Plato, Sophist. Translation by Lesley Brown. 245e.
      Well, although we haven't discussed the views of all those who make precise reckonings of being and not [being], we've done enough on that score.
  9. Account; reason; motive; sake; behalf.
    • Hudibras
      But left the trade, as many more / Have lately done on the same score.
    • Dryden
      You act your kindness in Cydria's score.
  10. A notch or incision; especially, one that is made as a tally mark; hence, a mark, or line, made for the purpose of account.
    • Shakespeare
      Whereas, before, our forefathers had no other books but the score and the tally, thou hast caused printing to be used.
  11. An account or reckoning; account of dues; bill; hence, indebtedness.
    • Shakespeare
      He parted well, and paid his score.
  12. (US, crime, slang) A robbery; a criminal act.
    Let's pull a score!
  13. (US, crime, slang) A bribe paid to a police officer.
  14. (US, crime, slang) An illegal sale, especially of drugs.
    He made a big score.
  15. (US, crime, slang) A prostitute's client.
  16. (US, slang) A sexual conquest.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

score ‎(third-person singular simple present scores, present participle scoring, simple past and past participle scored)

  1. (transitive) To cut a notch or a groove in a surface.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, “Foreword”, in The China Governess[1]:
      A very neat old woman, still in her good outdoor coat and best beehive hat, was sitting at a polished mahogany table on whose surface there were several scored scratches so deep that a triangular piece of the veneer had come cleanly away, […].
    The baker scored the cake so that the servers would know where to slice it.
  2. (intransitive) To record the tally of points for a game, a match, or an examination.
  3. (transitive) To obtain something desired.
    1. To earn points in a game.
      It is unusual for a team to score a hundred goals in one game.
      Pelé scores again!
      • 2011 September 29, Jon Smith, “Tottenham 3 - 1 Shamrock Rovers”, in BBC Sport[2]:
        And White Hart Lane was stunned when Rovers scored just five minutes after the restart in front of their away following.
    2. To achieve (a score) in e.g. a test.
      • 2004, Diane McGuinness, Early reading instruction: what science really tells us about how to teach reading
        At the end of first grade, the children scored 80 percent correct on this test, a value that remained unchanged through third grade.
    3. (slang) To acquire or gain.
      I scored some drugs last night.
      Did you score tickets for the concert?
    4. (US, crime, slang, of a police officer) To extract a bribe.
    5. (slang) To obtain a sexual favor.
      Chris finally scored with Pat last week.
  4. (transitive) To provide (a film, etc.) with a musical score.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

InterjectionEdit

score!

  1. (US, slang) Acknowledgement of success

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Tom Dalzell, The Routledge Dictionary of Modern American Slang and Unconventional English, 2008, page 846

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from English score.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /skoːrə/, [ˈsɡ̊oːɐ]

NounEdit

score c (singular definite scoren, plural indefinite scorer)

  1. A score, a number of points earned.

InflectionEdit

VerbEdit

score

  1. score
  2. land (to acquire; to secure)
  3. nick (Wikisaurus:steal)
  4. pull (persuade (someone) to have sex with one) [from 1959]

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: sco‧re

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from English score.

NounEdit

score m ‎(plural scores, diminutive scoretje n)

  1. score (number of points earned)

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from English score.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

score m ‎(plural scores)

  1. score (in a sport, game)

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Via English score, from Old Norse skor. Related to skera (modern Norwegian Bokmål skjære).

VerbEdit

score ‎(imperative scor, present tense scorer, passive scores, simple past and past participle scora or scoret, present participle scorende)

  1. to score (earn points in a game)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

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