coustume

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

PIE word
*ḱóm
PIE word
*swé

From Old French coustume, from Vulgar Latin *cōnsuētūmen or *costūmen, from Latin cōnsuētūdinem, accusative singular of cōnsuētūdō (custom, habit), from cōnsuēscō (accustom, habituate), from con- (with) + suēscō (become used or accustomed to). First element con- derives from cum, from Old Latin com, from Proto-Italic *kom, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm (with, along). Second element suēscō is from Proto-Indo-European *swe-dʰh₁-sk-, from *swé (self) + *dʰeh₁- (to put, place, set); related to Latin suus (one's own, his own).

NounEdit

coustume f (plural coustumes)

  1. custom; tradition
    • 1488, Jean Dupré, Lancelot du Lac, page 59:
      Beaux seigneurs vous scavez bien que la coustume de ceans est telle que nous devons eslire cellui a nostre escient qui le mieulx a fait au tournoiement.
      Good sirs, you know very well that our custom is that we have to choose who, to the best of our knowledge, has performed the best in the tournament.

DescendantsEdit

  • French: coutume

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

PIE word
*ḱóm
PIE word
*swé

From Vulgar Latin *cōnsuētūmen or *costūmen, from Latin cōnsuētūdinem, accusative singular of cōnsuētūdō (custom, habit), from cōnsuēscō (accustom, habituate), from con- (with) + suēscō (become used or accustomed to). First element con- derives from cum, from Old Latin com, from Proto-Italic *kom, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm (with, along). Second element suēscō is from Proto-Indo-European *swe-dʰh₁-sk-, from *swé (self) + *dʰeh₁- (to put, place, set); related to Latin suus (one's own, his own).

NounEdit

coustume f (oblique plural coustumes, nominative singular coustume, nominative plural coustumes)

  1. order; tradition
  2. custom; tradition

DescendantsEdit