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See also: Tradition

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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English tradicioun, borrowed Old French tradicion, from Latin trāditiō, from the verb trādere. Doublet of treason.

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: trə-dishʹ(ə)n, IPA(key): /tɹəˈdɪʃən/, /tɹəˈdɪʃn̩/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪʃən

NounEdit

tradition (countable and uncountable, plural traditions)

  1. A part of culture that is passed from person to person or generation to generation, possibly differing in detail from family to family, such as the way to celebrate holidays.
    • 1920, T. S. Eliot, “Tradition and the Individual Talent”, in The Sacred Wood:
      Yet if the only form of tradition, of handing down, consisted in following the ways of the immediate generation before us in a blind or timid adherence to its successes, "tradition" should positively be discouraged.
    • 1928, Lawrence R. Bourne, chapter 2, in Well Tackled![1]:
      Evidently he did not mean to be a mere figurehead, but to carry on the old tradition of Wilsthorpe's; and that was considered to be a good thing in itself and an augury for future prosperity.
    • 1850, Charles Dickens, A Christmas Tree:
      After breakfast, Charles Macdoodle told Lady Mary that it was a tradition in the family that those rumbling carriages on the terrace betokened death.
  2. A commonly held system. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  3. The act of delivering into the hands of another; delivery.
    • Blackstone
      A deed takes effect only from the tradition or delivery.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

tradition (third-person singular simple present traditions, present participle traditioning, simple past and past participle traditioned)

  1. (obsolete) To transmit by way of tradition; to hand down.
    • Fuller
      The following story is [] traditioned with very much credit amongst our English Catholics.

Further readingEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tradiˈsjoːn/, [tˢʁɑd̥iˈɕonˀ]

NounEdit

tradition c (singular definite traditionen, plural indefinite traditioner)

  1. tradition

InflectionEdit

Further readingEdit


FinnishEdit

NounEdit

tradition

  1. Genitive singular form of traditio.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French tradition, from Old French, borrowed from Latin trāditiō, trāditiōnem, from the verb trādere. Compare trahison.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tradition f (plural traditions)

  1. tradition
  2. A type of baguette or French stick

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French tradicion (delivery), a borrowing from Latin.

NounEdit

tradition f (plural traditions)

  1. delivery
  2. treason
  3. fable; oral narrative
  4. custom
  5. tradition

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tradition c

  1. tradition

DeclensionEdit

Declension of tradition 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative tradition traditionen traditioner traditionerna
Genitive traditions traditionens traditioners traditionernas

Related termsEdit