crockery

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

 
A set of crockery (sense 2) by the Japanese ceramic designer Masahiro Mori.

From crocker ((obsolete) potter) +‎ -ery (suffix with the sense ‘a class, group, or collection of’ forming nouns).[1] Crocker is derived from crock (earthenware or stoneware jar or storage container) + -er (suffix attached to nouns indicating persons whose occupations are indicated by the nouns); crock is from Middle English crok, crokke (earthenware jar, pot, or other container; cauldron; belly, stomach) [and other forms], from Old English crocc, crocca (crock, pot, vessel) [and other forms],[2][3] from Proto-Germanic *krukkō, *krukkô (vessel), from Proto-Indo-European *growg- (vessel).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

crockery (usually uncountable, plural crockeries)

  1. Crocks or earthenware vessels, especially domestic utensils, collectively.
    • 1843, W[illiam] M[akepeace] Thackeray, “From Waterford to Cork”, in The Irish Sketch Book, London; Glasgow: Collins’ Clear-type Press, OCLC 10228646, page 60:
      All the street was lined with wretched hucksters and their merchandise of gooseberries, green apples, children's dirty cakes, cheap crockeries, brushes, and tin-ware; among which objects the people were swarming about busily.
  2. Dishes, plates, and similar tableware collectively, usually made of some ceramic material, used for serving food on and eating from.

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TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ crockery, n.”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, September 2018; “crockery, n.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  2. ^ crokke, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  3. ^ crock, n.1”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2021; “crock1, n.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.

Further readingEdit