Last modified on 7 November 2014, at 16:50

de novo

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Latin adverb dē novō (from the new); from (from) + novō, the ablative singular of novus (new).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

de novo (not comparable)

  1. Anew, afresh, from the beginning; without consideration of previous instances, proceedings or determinations.
    De novo kidney transplantation.
    De novo prediction of three-dimensional structures for major protein families.
    He filed a motion for a de novo hearing.

AdverbEdit

de novo

  1. anew (from the beginning)

TranslationsEdit

Usage notesEdit

  • Because this is a Latin phrase, it is often italicized when written (i.e., de novo).
  • In law, de novo is the most rigorous of the three standards by which common law court decisions are reviewed on appeal; the other two are clear error and abuse of discretion.

See alsoEdit

For further information see the Wikipedia article on trial de novo.


InterlinguaEdit

AdverbEdit

de novo (not comparable)

  1. again (another time)

LatinEdit

AdverbEdit

novō (not comparable)

  1. de novo, afresh, anew.
    • 1180-1190, Andreas Capellanus, De amore, Book II, vi
      Sed quamvis in tanta simus audacter et improvide tempestatis unda prolapsi, de novo tamen amore cogitare non possumus vel alium liberationis modum exquirere.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dē novō (anew).

AdverbEdit

de novo (not comparable)

  1. (informal) again (another time)

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit