Contents

TranslingualEdit

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Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From French de.

SymbolEdit

de

  1. (radio slang) from (operator), this is (operator)

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Alternative formsEdit

  • dee (Northumbria)

VerbEdit

de ‎(third-person singular simple present diz, present participle dein, simple past did, past participle dyun)

  1. (Northumbria) To do.

ReferencesEdit

  • The New Geordie Dictionary, Frank Graham, 1987, ISBN 0946928118
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [2]
  • Northumberland Words, English Dialect Society, R. Oliver Heslop, 1893–4
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, ISBN 1904794165

StatisticsEdit

Most common English words before 1923: called · p · Lord · #188: de · whole · find · got

Etymology 2Edit

Eye dialect spelling of the.

ArticleEdit

de

  1. Pronunciation spelling of the, representing African American Vernacular English.

AnagramsEdit


Alemannic GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • der (before a vowel)
  • dr (Bern)

ArticleEdit

de

  1. (definite) the

DeclensionEdit

Alemannic German definite articles
Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural
Nominative/Accusative de
dr (Bern)
d s
ds (Bern)
d
Dative em der em de
  • Masculine nominative/accusative singular de has the form der before a vowel, e.g. der alt Maa ‘the old man’
  • Dative plural de has the form den before a vowel, e.g. den alte Fraue ‘(to) the old women’
  • Feminine singular d and plural d have the variant di before an adjective, e.g. di jung Mueter ‘the young mother’



AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin .

PrepositionEdit

de

  1. of, from

Usage notesEdit

  • The preposition de contracts to d' before a word beginning with a vowel or h-: d'Asturies ‎(of Asturias), d'hermanu ‎(of a brother).

Derived termsEdit


CatalanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

de f ‎(plural des)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter D/d.

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin .

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

de ‎(before vowel or h d')

  1. of, from

CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish de.

PrepositionEdit

  1. (dated) of, from (only in names with Spanish origins or in phrases with Spanish construct)
    Santo Niño de Cebú
    Balaang Bata sa Sugbo
    Holy Child of Cebu
    hopia de Cebu
    Cebu's hopia or hopia of/from Cebu
    Isabel biyuda de Cortes
    Maria widow of Cortes

Related termsEdit


Central FranconianEdit

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

de ‎(definite, reduced)

  1. (most dialects) feminine nominative and accusative
  2. (most dialects) plural nominative and accusative
  3. (many dialects) plural dative
  4. (some dialects) masculine nominative
  5. (some dialects) masculine accusative
  6. (few dialects) feminine dative

Usage notesEdit

  • (masculine): Three terrorities must be distinguished: 1.) Ripuarian, in which the accusative takes the form of the nominative; 2.) western Moselle Franconian, in which the nominative takes the form of the accusative; 3.) eastern Moselle Franconian, in which nominative and accusative are distinct.
1.) In Ripuarian, the reduced masculine article in nominative and accusative is de only in a few places, including Bonn; most dialects have der. The full form is always .
2.) In western Moselle Franconian, the form is de, but becomes den before vowels, h-, and dental consonants. The full form is dän.
3.) In eastern Moselle Franconian, the reduced masculine article in the nominative is de in many dialects, der in others. The full form is där. The accusative takes den (full form: dän).
  • (feminine): Virtually all dialects use de as the reduced feminine article in nominative and accusative. The full form is die. In the dative, de is used in a few dialects of Ripuarian; the general form is der. The full form may be där or .
  • (plural): Virtually all dialects use de as the reduced plural article in nominative and accusative. The full form is die. In the dative, de is used in most dialects of Ripuarian. In Moselle Franconian the form is the same as the masculine accusative (see above). The full form of the dative plural may be dä, dän, or däne.
  • Westernmost Ripuarian has no case distinction whatsoever. Only the nominative forms are relevant for these dialects.

DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin .

PrepositionEdit

de

  1. of

Related termsEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

de

  1. they

See alsoEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

An unstressed variety of Middle Dutch die. See die for more information.

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

de

  1. the (definite article, masculine and feminine singular, plural)
    De man‎ ― The man (masculine singular)
    De vrouw‎ ― The woman (feminine singular)
    Het boek‎ ― The book (neuter singular)
    De boeken‎ ― The books (neuter plural)
    De oude man en de zee.‎ ― The old man and the sea.

Usage notesEdit

  • Placed before masculine and feminine nouns and plural nouns of all genders, indicating a specific person or thing instead of a general case.

DeclensionEdit

Dutch definite article
Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural
Nominative de de het de
Genitive des der des der
Dative den der den den
Accusative den de het de
  • There is also 's for des

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: die

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin de, French de, Spanish de.

PrepositionEdit

de

  1. from
    Mi ne aĉetas ion ajn de ĉi tiu vendejo!
    I don't buy anything at all from this store!
  2. possessed by
    La aŭto de Davido estas nigra.
    David's car is black.
  3. done, written or composed by
    Ĉu vi havas esperantan tradukon de Drakulo de Bram Stoker?
    Do you have an Esperanto translation of Dracula by Bram Stoker?
    La viro estis mordita de hundo.
    The man was bitten by a dog.

FalaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese de, from Latin ‎(of; from).

PrepositionEdit

de

  1. of
    • 2000, Domingo Frades Gaspar, Vamus a falal: Notas pâ coñocel y platical en nosa fala, Editora regional da Extremadura, Chapter 1: Lengua Española:
      Español falan millós de persoas.
      Millions of people speak Spanish.

Usage notesEdit

Contractions:


FaroeseEdit

NounEdit

de ?

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter D/d.

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin .

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

de

  1. of (expresses belonging)
    • 1837, Louis Viardot, “I”, in L’Ingénieux Hidalgo Don Quichotte de la Manchefr.Wikisource, translation of El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra:
      Dans une bourgade de la Manche, dont je ne veux pas me rappeler le nom, vivait, il n’y a pas longtemps, un hidalgo ....
      In a village of La Mancha, whose name I do not want to remember, lived, not long ago, an hidalgo ....
    Paris est la capitale de la France.‎ ― Paris is the capital of France.
    En 1905, les églises devinrent la propriété de l'État.‎ ― In 1905, churches became the property of the state.
  2. of (used to express property or association)
    Œuvres de Fermat‎ ― Fermat’s Works
    Elle est la femme de mon ami.‎ ― She is my friend’s wife.
    le voisin de Gabriel‎ ― Gabriel's neighbor
  3. from (used to indicate origin)
    Elle vient de France.‎ ― She comes from France.
    Êtes-vous de Suisse ?‎ ― Are you from Switzerland?
    Ce fromage vient d’Espagne.‎ ― This cheese is from Spain.
    C’est de l’ouest de la France.‎ ― It’s from the west of France.
    Le train va de Paris à Bordeaux.‎ ― The train goes from Paris to Bordeaux.
  4. of (indicates an amount)
    5 kilos de pommes.‎ ― 5 kilograms of apples.
    Un verre de vin‎ ― A glass of wine
    Une portion de frites‎ ― A portion of fries
  5. used attributively, often translated into English as a compound word
    Un jus de pomme‎ ― An apple juice
    Un verre de vin‎ ― A glass of wine
    Une boîte de nuit‎ ― A night club
    Un chien de garde‎ ― A guard dog
    Une voiture de sport‎ ― A sports car
    Un stade de football‎ ― A football stadium
  6. from (used to indicate the start of a time or range)
    De 9:00 à 11:00 je ne serai pas libre.‎ ― From 9 to 11 I won’t be free.
    Je travaille de huit heures à midi.‎ ― I work from 8 o'clock to noon.
    un groupe de cinq à huit personnes‎ ― a group of [from] five to eight people
  7. used after certain verbs before an infinitive, often translating into English as a gerund or an infinitive
    J’ai arrêté de fumer.‎ ― I stopped smoking.
    Il continue de m’embêter.‎ ― He keeps annoying me.
    Elle m’a dit de venir.‎ ― She told me to come.
    Nous vous proposons de venir.‎ ― We suggest you to come.
  8. by
    Boire trois tasses par jour réduirait de 20 % les risques de contracter une maladie.‎ ― Drinking three cups a day would reduce the risk of catching an illness by 20%.

Usage notesEdit

Before a word beginning with a vowel sound, de elides to d’. Before the article le, it contracts with the article into du, as shown in the example above. Before the article les, it contracts with the article into des.

Le Songe d’une nuit d’été — “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” (Literally, “The Dream of a night of summer”)
La queue du chien — “The dog’s tail”
Index des auteurs — “Index of the authors”

ArticleEdit

de

  1. (indefinite) some; any (in questions or negatives)
    Je voudrais de la viande.‎ ― I'd like some meat.
    Est-ce qu'il y a de la bonne musique ?‎ ― Is there any good music?
    Nous cherchons du lait.‎ ― We're looking for some milk.
  2. (negative) a, an, any
    Elle n'a pas de mère.‎ ― She doesn't have a mother.
    Il n'a pas de crayon.‎ ― He doesn't have a pencil.
    Je n'ai pas de temps.‎ ― I don't have any time.

Usage notesEdit

In the positive, de is usually used with a definite article, as in the examples. In the negative, without an article.

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin .

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

de

  1. of, from

Usage notesEdit

The preposition de contracts to d- before articles, before third-person tonic pronouns, and before the determiners algún and outro.

Derived termsEdit


Haitian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French deux ‎(two)

NumeralEdit

de

  1. two

HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

de (not comparable)

  1. how!, very much
    De szép ez a ház!‎ ― Oh, how beautiful that house is!

SynonymsEdit

ConjunctionEdit

de

  1. but
  2. (oh) yes!, surely! (used as a positive contradiction to a negative statement)
    Nem voltál itt! - De ott voltam.‎ ― You weren't here! - Yes I was there!

Derived termsEdit

(Expressions):

See alsoEdit


IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French and Spanish de.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

de

  1. from (indicating departure, dependency, starting point, origin or derivation)
    Me kompris la frukti de la merkato.
    I bought the fruits from the market.
  2. of (with a noun: indicating measurement, quantity, amount, content)
    Me esis un de kin en la konkurso.
    I was one of five in the competition.
    Me prizas tre multe tasego de kafeo ye la matino.
    I really like a big cup of coffee in the morning.
  3. of (with an adjective: indicating measurement, dimension)
    Me havas tri boteli plena de aquo.
    I have three bottles of water.
  4. with a title of nobility
    Rejio de Anglia
    Queen of England

AntonymsEdit

  • ad ‎(to)
  • til ‎(until, till)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

  • di ‎(of (indicates possession or association))
  • da ‎(by)

See alsoEdit

  • ek ‎(out of, out from)

InterlinguaEdit

IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dʲɛ/, /dʲə/
  • (Connemara and the Aran Islands) IPA(key): /ɡə/

PrepositionEdit

de ‎(plus dative, triggers lenition, used only before consonant sounds)

  1. from
  2. of

InflectionEdit

Person Normal Emphatic
1st person sing. díom díomsa
2d person sing. díot díotsa
3d sing. masc. de desean
3d sing. fem. di dise
1st person pl. dínn dínne
2d person pl. díbh díbhse
3d person pl. díobh díobhsan

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

  • d’ (used before a vowel sound)

ItalianEdit

ContractionEdit

de

  1. apocopic form of del
    Michael Radford è il regista de "Il postino".‎ ― Michael Radford is the director of "Il Postino".

Usage notesEdit

De is used where del, della, etc, would ordinarily be used, but cannot be because the article is part of the title of a film, book, etc.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

de

  1. rōmaji reading of
  2. rōmaji reading of

Jersey DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate to Dutch de ‎(the).

ArticleEdit

de

  1. the
    • 1912, Tijdschrift voor Nederlandsche taal— en letterkunde, volumes 31-32, page 309:
      De v'lôrene zön
      The prodigal (literally "lost") son

LadinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin .

PrepositionEdit

de

  1. of, from

Related termsEdit


LadinoEdit

LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Etruscan. Etruscan names of stops were the stop followed by /eː/[1].

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

‎(indeclinable)

  1. The name of the letter D.
Coordinate termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ (2012) The Unicode Consortium, The Unicode Standard: Version 6.1 – Core Specification. ISBN 978-1-936213-02-3, page 468; citing: (1985) Geoffrey Sampson, Writing Systems: A Linguistic Introduction, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. ISBN 0-8047-1254-9.
  • Arthur E. Gordon, The Letter Names of the Latin Alphabet (University of California Press, 1973; volume 9 of University of California Publications: Classical Studies), part III: “Summary of the Ancient Evidence”, page 32: "Clearly there is no question or doubt about the names of the vowels A, E, I, O, U. They are simply long A, long E, etc. (ā, ē, ī, ō, ū). Nor is there any uncertainty with respect to the six mutes B, C, D, G, P, T. Their names are bē, cē, dē, gē, pē, tē (each with a long E). Or about H, K, and Q: they are hā, kā, kū—each, again, with a long vowel sound."

Etymology 2Edit

Perhaps from ded (compare Oscan dat), old ablative of pronom. stem da ‎(as far as); and the suffixes, old case-forms, -dam, -dem, -dum, -do with the locative -de.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

‎(used with an ablative)

  1. of, concerning, about
    • 1774, Finnur Jónsson, Historia Ecclesiastica Islandiæ 1
      De introductione religionis Christianæ in Islandiam.
      Of the introduction of Christianity to Iceland.
    De rebus mathematicis.‎ ― Concerning mathematical things.
  2. from, away from, down from, out of (in general to indicate the person or place from which any thing is taken, etc., with verbs of taking away, depriving, demanding, requesting, inquiring, buying; as capere, sumere, emere, quaerere, discere, trahere, etc., and their compounds).
    Emere de aliquo.‎ ― To buy from someone.
    Aliquid mercari de aliquo.‎ ― To buy something from someone.
    De aliquo quaerere, quid, etc., C‎ ― To search for someone.
    Saepe hoc audivi de patre.‎ ― I often hear this from father.
    De mausoleo exaudita vox est.‎ ― A voice was heard from the mausoleum.
    Ut sibi liceret discere id de me.‎ ― (please add an English translation of this usage example)
    Animam de corpore mitto.‎ ― I release the spirit from the body.
    Aliquo quom jam sucus de corpore cessit.‎ ― (please add an English translation of this usage example)
    Civitati persuasit, ut de finibus suis cum omnibus copiis exirent.‎ ― He persuaded the people to go forth from their territories with all their possessions.
    Decedere de provincia.‎ ― To retire from office.
    De vita decedere.‎ ― To withdraw from life
    Exire de vita.‎ ― to exit out of life. (compare excedere e vita)
    De triclinio, de cubiculo exire.‎ ― To go out from the triclinium, from the cubiculum.
    Hamum de cubiculo ut e navicula jacere.‎ ― (please add an English translation of this usage example)
    De castris procedere.‎ ― To proceed out of the military camps.
    Brassica de capite et de oculis omnia (mala) deducet.‎ ― (please add an English translation of this usage example)
    De digito anulum detraho.‎ ― From the finger I pull the ring.
    De matris complexu aliquem avellere atque abstrahere.‎ ― (please add an English translation of this usage example)
    Nomen suum de tabula sustulit.‎ ― He removed his name from the tablet.
    Ferrum de manibus extorsimus.‎ ― (please add an English translation of this usage example)
    Juris utilitas vel a peritis vel de libris depromi potest.‎ ― The utility of a law is able to be produced either from an expert or from books.
    ...decido de lecto praeceps.‎ ― (please add an English translation of this usage example)
    De muro se deicere.‎ ― (please add an English translation of this usage example)
    De sella exsilire.‎ ― (please add an English translation of this usage example)
    Nec ex equo vel de muro etc., hostem destinare.‎ ― (please add an English translation of this usage example)
    De caelo aliquid demittere.‎ ― To bring down something from the sky.
    1. with petere, of a place
      De vicino terra petita solo.‎ ― (please add an English translation of this usage example)
    2. (Late Latin) of persons
      Peto de te.‎ ― (please add an English translation of this usage example)
  3. to depart, withdraw from
    De altera parte agri Sequanos decedere juberet.‎ ― (please add an English translation of this usage example)
Usage notesEdit
  • De denotes the going out, departure, removal, or separating of an object from any fixed point (it occupies a middle place between ab ‎(away from) which denotes a mere external departure, and ex ‎(out of) which signifies from the interior of a thing. Hence verbs compounded with de are constructed not only with de, but quite as frequently with ab and ex; and, on the other hand, those compounded with ab and ex often have the terminus a quo indicated by de).
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Aragonese: de
  • Asturian: de
  • Aromanian: di
  • Catalan: de
  • Corsican: di
  • Dalmatian: de
  • Esperanto: de
  • Franco-Provençal: de
  • French: de
  • Friulian: di
  • Galician: de
  • Ido: de
  • Interlingua: de
  • Italian: di
  • Ladin: de
  • Ladino: de
  • Neapolitan: 'e
  • Occitan: de
  • Portuguese: de
  • Romanian: de
  • Romansch: da
  • Sicilian: di
  • Spanish: de

LojbanEdit

CmavoEdit

de

  1. (pro-sumti) someone/something that exists #2
    ro da poi plini la solri ku'o de poi mluni zo'u da se mluni de
    For every planet x orbiting around the Sun, there exists a moon y such that x is orbited by y.
    ro da poi plini la solri cu se mluni de poi mluni [1]
    Every planet orbiting around the Sun has an orbiting moon.

Usage notesEdit

Multiple occurrences of de in logically connected sentences refer to the same thing.

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ John Woldemar Cowan, The Lojban Reference Grammar, §16.5: Dropping the prenex.

Low GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Saxon.

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

de ‎(genitive der, dative den, accusative de, definite article)

  1. the

Usage notesEdit

  • This is the only plural article and like English 'the' is used for nouns of every gender and class. Indefinite nouns in plural are used without article, again as in English.

ArticleEdit

de f ‎(genitive der, dative der, accusative de, definite article)

  1. the
    De Fru gat hen.‎ ― The woman walks [lit. goes] there.

ArticleEdit

de m ‎(genitive des, dative dęme, accusative denne, definite article)

  1. the
    De Mann gat hen.‎ ― The man walks [lit. goes] there.

Usage notesEdit

  • Dative or accusative are sometimes called 'object case'. However, most (if not all) dialects have not built a proper Objective case.
  • Dem (from Middle Low German 'deme') can be found as 'den' as well due to interchangeability of m and n in Middle Low German.

PronounEdit

de m ‎(accusative den)

  1. (relative) which, that
    De Mann, de dår güng.‎ ― The man, which walked there.
    De Mann, den wi hüert häbben.‎ ― The man, which we hired.

Usage notesEdit

  • The use as a relative pronoun might not be present in all dialects.

PronounEdit

de f ‎(accusative de)

  1. (relative) which, that
    De Fru, de wi hüert hębben.‎ ― The woman, which we have hired.

Usage notesEdit

  • The use as a relative pronoun might not be present in all dialects.

LuxembourgishEdit

PronounEdit

de

  1. unstressed form of du

DeclensionEdit


MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

de (Zhuyin ㄉㄜ˙)

  1. Pinyin transliteration of
  2. Pinyin transliteration of
  3. Pinyin transliteration of

RomanizationEdit

de (Zhuyin ㄉㄜ˙)

  1. Nonstandard spelling of .
  2. Nonstandard spelling of .

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Mauritian CreoleEdit

Mauritian Creole cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : de
    Ordinal : deziem
    Adverbial : ledoub

EtymologyEdit

From French deux.

NumeralEdit

de

  1. (cardinal) two

Derived termsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

PrepositionEdit

de

  1. of
  2. from

Northern SamiEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions.

ConjunctionEdit

de

  1. then, after that
  2. then, in that case

AdverbEdit

de

  1. yes

Norwegian BokmålEdit

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

de

  1. definite article, equivalent to "the", used before adjectives used with plural nouns; also used before adjectives converted to nouns. Usually capitalised as "De" when used in proper nouns.

Related termsEdit

PronounEdit

de ‎(accusative dem, genitive deres)

  1. they
  2. those

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse þér, ér and þit, it.

PronounEdit

de ‎(objective case dykk, possessive dykkar)

  1. you (second-person plural)
SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From French, Latin.

PrepositionEdit

de

  1. used in set expressions (such as de jure); translates to "from" and "of"

ReferencesEdit


OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Latin de.

PrepositionEdit

de

  1. of
  2. from

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin .

PrepositionEdit

de

  1. of
  2. from

Usage notesEdit

  • before a vowel, either remains as a separate word or becomes d'

Derived termsEdit


Old PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • d- (elided form when followed by a word which begins with a vowel)
  • D- (elided form when followed by a capitalised word which begins with a vowel)

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ‎(of; from).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

de

  1. of

DescendantsEdit

  • Fala: de
  • Galician: de
  • Portuguese: de

Old ProvençalEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin

PrepositionEdit

de

  1. of
  2. from

PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese de ‎(of), from Latin ‎(of).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

de

  1. of (in relation to)
    • 2005, Lya Wyler (translator), J. K. Rowling (English author), Harry Potter e o Enigma do Príncipe (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince), Rocco, page 138:
      O protesto de Hermione foi abafado por uma risadinha alta.
      Hermione's objection was interrupted by a loud little laugh.
    os amigos dele
    his friends (lit. the friends of his)
    1. of (forms compounds; often untranslated)
      fones de ouvido
      headphones (lit. phones of ear)
      acampamento de verão
      summer camp
    2. of; about (on the subject of)
      Do que estavam falando?
      What were they talking about?
    3. of; -'s (belonging to)
      a casa de alguém
      someone's house
    4. -'s (made by)
      Você provou o bolo da minha mãe?
      have you tried my mother’s cake?
    5. of (being a part of)
      capa do livro
      cover 'of the book
    6. of (introduces the month a given day is part of)
      Primeiro de janeiro.
      First of January.
    7. of (introduces the object of an agent noun)
      Hitler foi um exterminador de judeus.
      Hitler was an exterminator of Jews.
    8. of (introduces a the name of a place following its hypernym)
      A vila de Iorque.
      The village of York.
  2. of; -en (made or consisting of)
    De que é feito?
    What is this made of? (lit. Of what is made this?)
    1. -long (having the duration of)
      um filme de duas horas
      a two hour-long movie
    2. of (indicates the composition of a given collective or quantitative noun)
      Milhares de pessoas vieram.
      Thousands of people came.
    3. of (characterised by; having the given quality)
      O templo não é mais um local de paz.
      The temple is no longer a place of peace.
  3. of (introduces the noun that applies a given adjective or past participle)
    Um balde cheio de água.
    A bucket full of water.
  4. from (born in or coming out of)
    De onde você é?
    Where are you from?
  5. by means of; by
    Eu sempre vou trabalhar de ônibus.
    I always go to work by bus.
  6. as (in the role of)
    Na festa, ele estava de bruxo.
    At the party, he was dressed as a wizard.
  7. in (wearing)
    Homens de Preto
    Men in Black

QuotationsEdit

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:de.

Usage notesEdit

Used in the following contractions:


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin .

PronunciationEdit

  • Rhymes: -e

PrepositionEdit

de ‎(+accusative)

  1. from
    Casa mea nu este departe de aici.‎ ― My house is not far from here.
  2. of
    o ceașcă de ceai‎ ― a cup of tea
    un profesor de matematică‎ ― a professor of mathematics
  3. by
    o carte scrisă de Marin Preda.‎ ― a book written by Marin Preda

RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Puter, Vallader) di
  • (Sursilvan, Sutsilvan) gi

EtymologyEdit

From Latin diēs.

NounEdit

de m (plural des)

  1. (Surmiran) day

Scottish GaelicEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

de


  1. of, off

Derived termsEdit

  • bhàrr ‎(down from, from off)
  • The following prepositional pronouns:
Person Number Prepositional pronoun Prepositional pronoun (emphatic)
Singular 1st dhiom dhiomsa
2nd dhiot dhiotsa
3rd m dheth dhethsan
3rd f dhith dhithse
Plural 1st dhinn dhinne
2nd dhibh dhibhse
3rd dhiubh dhiubhsan

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *kъdě, *kъde, from Proto-Indo-European *kwu-dhē.

AdverbEdit

de

  1. (Kajkavian, regional) where

PronounEdit

de

  1. (Kajkavian, regional) where

SynonymsEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (after a pause, 'l', 'm', 'n' and 'ñ') IPA(key): /de/, [d̪e̞]
  • (elsewhere) IPA(key): /de/, [ð̞e̞]
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

de f ‎(plural des)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter D/d.

Etymology 2Edit

Spanish preposition “de” written as a ligature in capitals
Hand-painted preposition “DE” in the wild

From Latin de.

PrepositionEdit

de

  1. of; ’s; used after the thing owned and before the owner
    Constitución española de 1812
    Spanish constitution of 1812
    la cola del perro
    the dog’s tail
  2. from
    Soy de España.
    I’m from Spain.
  3. of, from (indicating cause)
    Él murió de hambre.
    He died of hunger.
  4. used to construct compound nouns (with attributive nouns)
    campamento de verano
    summer camp
Usage notesEdit

As illustrated in the example above, de combines with el to form del.

Derived termsEdit

Sranan TongoEdit

VerbEdit

de

  1. To be.

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse þeir, from Proto-Germanic *þai (with noun ending -r).

Alternative formsEdit

  • (informal) dom
  • (informal, dialectal) di

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

de ‎(third-person plural nominative, dative and accusative dem, genitive deras, reflexive sig)

  1. they

DeclensionEdit

ArticleEdit

de

  1. the, a definite article used in the beginning of noun phrases containing attributive adjectives and nouns in the plural. This article is used together with the definite suffix of the noun to indicate the definiteness of the noun phrase.
    de gröna bilarna‎ ― the green cars

Usage notesEdit

The same type of noun phrases with singular nouns instead use den (common gender) or det (neuter) for this function. Some definite noun phrase with attributive adjectives may skip these preceding articles. This is the case especially for many lexicalized noun phrases and also for many noun phrases working as proper names of organisations, geographical places, TV shows, events and similar.

Brittiska öarna
The British Isles

While the personal pronoun de has an object form and a genitive form, the definite article de is unaffected by the syntactic role of the noun phrase.


TarantinoEdit

PrepositionEdit

de

  1. of

Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English day.

NounEdit

de

  1. day
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, Genesis 1:5 (translation here):
      Tulait em i kolim “De,” na tudak em i kolim “Nait.” Nait i go pinis na moning i kamap. Em i de namba wan.

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. Tok Pisin is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

TurkishEdit

AdverbEdit

de

  1. as well, too, also
    Özer de sorunun yanıtını biliyor‎ ― Özer also knows the answer of the question
    Berker de bizimle geliyor‎ ― Berker is coming with us as well
    Utku de dondurma yemeyi sever‎ ― Utku likes eating ice cream, too.

Usage notesEdit

  • It's used when the previous word's last vowel is "e", "i", "ö" or "ü". Otherwise (if the word's last vowel is "a", "ı", "o" or "u"); it becomes "da"

SynonymsEdit

NounEdit

de

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter D/d.

VerbEdit

de

  1. (imperative) say

See alsoEdit


VolapükEdit

PrepositionEdit

de

  1. of, from

WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Contraction of older deau ‎(right; south), from Proto-Celtic *dexso ‎(right). Cognate with Cornish dyhow, Breton dehou, Irish deas.

The sense "south" comes from the fact that the south is on the right-hand side of a person facing east.[1]

AdjectiveEdit

de ‎(feminine singular de, plural de)

  1. right (opposite of left)
  2. south, southern
Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

de m, f (uncountable)

  1. right
  2. south
Usage notesEdit
  • The noun has masculine gender when used with the sense of "south" and feminine gender when used with the sense "right".
MutationEdit
Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
de dde ne unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Mutated form of te ‎(tea).

NounEdit

de

  1. Soft mutation of te.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
te de nhe the
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Evans, D. Silvan (1893) Dictionary of the Welsh Language[1], page 1388

West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare Dutch and Low German de, English the, German der.

ArticleEdit

de c

  1. the (definite article preceding nouns of common gender and all plurals)

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


ZandeEdit

NounEdit

de

  1. woman

ZuluEdit

AdjectiveEdit

-de

  1. long
  2. tall, high

Derived termsEdit


ǃKungEdit

NounEdit

de

  1. woman

Related termsEdit


GermanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

de

  1. comparative degree of vorausgehend
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