de trop

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French de trop (too much).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

de trop (comparative more de trop, superlative most de trop)

  1. excessive or superfluous
    I think that wellingtons are a little de trop for a light shower.
    • 1847 January – 1848 July, William Makepeace Thackeray, chapter 6, in Vanity Fair, London: Bradbury and Evans  [], published 1848, OCLC 3174108:
      "I should only be de trop," said the Captain, looking at them rather wistfully. "I'd best go and talk to the hermit,"—and so he strolled off out of the hum of men, and noise, and clatter of the banquet, into the dark walk, at the end of which lived that well-known pasteboard Solitary.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /də tʁo/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

de trop (invariable)

  1. too many, too much, more than is desirable, in excess
    Synonym: en trop
    Vous m’avez rendu dix centimes de trop.You gave me back ten cents too much.
    la fois de tropthe straw that broke the camel's back
    le mot de tropthe last straw
    ne pas être de tropnot to go amiss
  2. unnecessary; unwanted; in the way
    Synonyms: gênant, importun, indésirable
    Je me suis senti de trop pendant cette soirée.I felt like I was unwanted during that evening.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: de trop