See also: tròp, trop., trop-, -trop, and -trop-

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tɹɒp/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɒp

NounEdit

trop (uncountable)

  1. (medicine, colloquial) Abbreviation of troponin.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin tropus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trop m (plural trops)

  1. (rhetoric) trope

Etymology 2Edit

PronounEdit

trop

  1. (obsolete) too much, too many

AdverbEdit

trop

  1. (obsolete) too, too much
    Synonym: massa

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French trop, from Old French trop (unreasonably excessive), from Frankish *þorp (a cluster, agglomeration", also "collection of houses, village), from Proto-Germanic *þurpą (village), from Proto-Indo-European *trab-, *treb- (dwelling, room) which are cognate with Old Saxon thorp (village), Old High German dorf (village), Old English þorp (village). Cognate with Italian troppo, and Piedmontese tròp/trop. More at English thorp, English troop.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

trop

  1. too; too much
    La soupe est trop chaude.
    The soup is too hot.
    J'ai trop mangé.
    I have eaten too much.
  2. (colloquial, intensifier) very, really, so
    Synonyms: méga, fin
    Elle est trop belle !
    She is so beautiful!

Usage notesEdit

  1. ^ Liaison is only permitted after adverbial use of trop: when used (pro)nominally (as in the sentence il y en a trop ici), it takes on the quality of a singular noun that prevents liaison with the following word. As it can be difficult to draw an unequivocal distinction between its adverbial and nominal uses, one may prefer to always forgo liaison following trop — even where it is permissible, liaison after trop is not only optional, but also significantly more formal than necessary (or appropriate) for most situations.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Esperanto: tro

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

AdverbEdit

trop

  1. too; too much

DescendantsEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French trop (unreasonably excessive), from Frankish *þorp (a cluster, agglomeration).

AdverbEdit

trop

  1. (Guernsey) too; too much

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Frankish *þorp.

AdverbEdit

trop

  1. excessively; too
  2. enough; sufficiently

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old OccitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Frankish *þorp. Gallo-Romance cognate with Old French trop.

AdverbEdit

trop

  1. too (excessively; to an excessive extent)

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PiedmonteseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trop m (plural trop)

  1. flock
    Synonym: strop

PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /trɔp/
  • Rhymes: -ɔp
  • Syllabification: trop

Etymology 1Edit

From dialectal Proto-Slavic *tropъ.

NounEdit

trop m inan

  1. clue
    Synonyms: klucz, wskazówka
  2. trace
    Synonyms: poszlaka, ślad
  3. spoor
DeclensionEdit
Related termsEdit
noun
verb

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

trop

  1. second-person singular imperative of tropić

Further readingEdit

  • trop in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • trop in Polish dictionaries at PWN

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French trope, from Latin tropus.

NounEdit

trop m (plural tropi)

  1. trope

DeclensionEdit