See also: tròp and trop.

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

trop (plural trops)

  1. (medicine, colloquial) Abbreviation of troponin.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French trop, from Old French trop (unreasonably excessive), from Frankish *thorp (a cluster, agglomeration", also "collection of houses, village), from Proto-Germanic *þurpą (village), from Proto-Indo-European *trab-, *treb- (dwelling, room). Cognate with Old Saxon thorp (village), Old High German thorf (village), Old English þorp (village). More at thorp, troop.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tʁo/
  • (file)

AdverbEdit

trop

  1. too; too much
    La soupe est trop chaude.
    The soup is too hot.
    J'ai trop mangé.
    I have eaten too much.
  2. (colloquial, intensifier) very, really, so
    Elle est trop belle !
    She is so beautiful!

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

AdverbEdit

trop

  1. too; too much

DescendantsEdit

  • French: trop

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French trop (unreasonably excessive), from Frankish *thorp (a cluster, agglomeration).

AdverbEdit

trop

  1. (Guernsey) too; too much

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Frankish *thorp.

AdverbEdit

trop

  1. excessively; too
  2. enough; sufficiently

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old OccitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Frankish *thorp. Gallo-Romance cognate with Old French trop.

AdjectiveEdit

trop

  1. too (excessively; to an excessive extent)

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PiedmonteseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trop m (plural trop)

  1. flock

PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From dialectal Proto-Slavic *tropъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trop m inan

  1. clue
  2. trace
  3. spoor

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • trop in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • trop in Polish dictionaries at PWN