Last modified on 6 February 2015, at 21:24

demonic

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Latin daemonicus, from Ancient Greek δαιμονικός (daimonikós, possessed by a demon, sent by a demon), from δαίμων (daímōn).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

demonic (comparative more demonic, superlative most demonic)

  1. Pertaining to demons or evil spirits; demoniac.
    Convinced that his uncle was a warlock, he rifled through his attic, looking for demonic artifacts.
    Once he had grasped the controls, he unleashed a demonic laugh that made his hostages shudder.
  2. Pertaining to dæmons in ancient Greek thought; concerning supernatural ‘genius’.
    • 1999, Joyce Crick, translating Sigmund Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams, I:
      Aristotle concedes that the nature of the dream is indeed daemonic [transl. dämonischer], but not divine – which might well reveal a profound meaning, if one could hit on the right translation.

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