See also: DEP, dép, dep., and đẹp

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Clipping of department, originally slang from Imperial College, first attested c. 1930.[1]

NounEdit

dep (countable and uncountable, plural deps)

  1. Short for department.

Etymology 2Edit

  • Abbreviation of several terms that begin with "dep".
  • Clipping of several terms that begin with "dep".

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

dep (countable and uncountable, plural deps)

  1. Short for deposit.
  2. Short for departure.
  3. (law, informal) A deposition.
    Don't worry too much if they don’t give us everything we need in their rog answers; we'll fill the gaps in dep.
  4. (informal) A deputy.
    • 1999, Alex Alexandrowicz, David Wilson, The Longest Injustice: The Strange Story of Alex Alexandrowicz
      [A]s soon as the door opened we could see it was the deputy governor coming through. [] We watched as the dep crossed the football field towards us.
  5. (Canada, Quebec, informal) A dépanneur.
  6. (computing, informal) A dependency.

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

dep (third-person singular simple present deps, present participle depping, simple past and past participle depped)

  1. (informal) To deputize.
    • 2004, John Chilton, Who's Who of British Jazz: 2nd Edition (page 212)
      Regularly with Bob Kerr's Whoopee Band for almost a year in the late 1990s and later deputized in the band, including a tour of Denmark (2003), also depped in Chris Barber's Band for Swedish tour (2001).

VerbEdit

dep

  1. depart or departs
  2. deposed

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Verlan for pédé.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dep m (plural deps)

  1. (verlan) gay; faggot

Middle EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dep

  1. Alternative form of depe

AdverbEdit

dep

  1. Alternative form of depe

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Partridge, Eric (1937) A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English[1], page 300