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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

1550s, from Late Latin despicabilis, from Latin dēspicor, a variant of dēspiciō (I despise), from de (down) + speciō (I look at, behold).[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dɪˈspɪkəbəl/, /ˈdɛspɪkəbəl/

AdjectiveEdit

despicable (comparative more despicable, superlative most despicable)

  1. Fit or deserving to be despised; contemptible; mean
    Synonyms: vile, evil

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

despicable (plural despicables)

  1. A wretched or wicked person.
    • 2004, Wayne Campbell Kannaday, Apologetic Discourse and the Scribal Tradition
      Robbers assemble other robbers for the purpose of robbery; but Christians gather thieves, bandits, and other despicables for the purpose of spiritual transformation.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ despicable” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.