diaphoresis

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin diaphorēsis, from Ancient Greek δῐᾰφόρησῐς (diaphórēsis, evaporation, dissipation, perspiration); equivalent to dia- (through, across) +‎ -phoresis (transmission).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

diaphoresis (countable and uncountable, plural diaphoreses)

  1. (physiology) perspiration, especially when profuse as a symptom of disease or a side effect of a drug
    • 1865, William J. Cummins, “Remarks on Scarlatina”, in The Dublin Quarterly Journal of Medical Science[1], volume 39, number 1, page 14:
      The train of symptoms which mark the typhoid variety of scarlatina generally begin to decline about the tenth or twelfth day, when the case often lapses into a condition similar to rheumatic fever, without its characteristic diaphoreses.
    Synonyms: hidrosis, perspiration, sudation, sudoresis, sweating

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek δῐᾰφόρησῐς (diaphórēsis, evaporation, dissipation), from δῐᾰφορέω (diaphoréō, to dissipate by evaporation or perspiration) +‎ -σῐς (-sis, action noun suffix).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

diaphorēsis f (genitive diaphorēsis or diaphorēseōs or diaphorēsios); third declension (Late Latin)

  1. (physiology) perspiration, diaphoresis

InflectionEdit

Third-declension noun (Greek-type, i-stem, i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative diaphorēsis diaphorēsēs
diaphorēseis
Genitive diaphorēsis
diaphorēseōs
diaphorēsios
diaphorēsium
Dative diaphorēsī diaphorēsibus
Accusative diaphorēsim
diaphorēsin
diaphorēsem1
diaphorēsēs
diaphorēsīs
Ablative diaphorēsī
diaphorēse1
diaphorēsibus
Vocative diaphorēsis
diaphorēsi
diaphorēsēs
diaphorēseis

1Found sometimes in Medieval and New Latin.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: diaphoresis