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Wiktionary β

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English dingle (a deep hollow; dell), from Old English *dyngel, a diminutive of Old English ding, dung (dungeon; pit), equivalent to dung +‎ -le. Compare also dimble (a dingle, glen, retired place).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dingle (plural dingles)

  1. A small, narrow or enclosed, usually wooded valley.
    • 1954, J. R. R. Tolkien, The Two Towers, Book III, Chapter 4
      Turning to the left and skirting this huge hedge Treebeard came in a few strides to a narrow entrance. Through it a worn path passed and dived suddenly down a long steep slope. The hobbits saw that they were descending into a great dingle, almost as round as a bowl, very wide and deep, crowned at the rim with the high dark evergreen hedge.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

Delated to dangle and denge

VerbEdit

dingle (imperative dingl or dingle, present tense dingler, passive dingles, simple past and past participle dingla or dinglet, present participle dinglende)

  1. to dangle, hang, swing

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

Delated to dangle and denge

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

dingle (present tense dinglar, past tense dingla, past participle dingla, passive infinitive dinglast, present participle dinglande, imperative dingle/dingl)

  1. to dangle, hang, swing

ReferencesEdit