Old IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From dí- +‎ fichid.

VerbEdit

do·fich (prototonic ·dich, verbal noun dígal)

  1. to avenge
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 72d11
      dum·em-se ⁊ deich tarm chenn
      protect me and avenge on my behalf
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 9d2
      .i. ↄdid flaith dó in coimdiu; is bésad inna flatho do·em e[t] do·fich
      So that the Lord is the ruler to it; it is the usage of the ruler that He protects and punishes for.
    • c. 700–800, Táin Bó Cúailnge, from the Yellow Book of Lecan, published in The Táin Bó Cúailnge from the Yellow Book of Lecan, with variant readings from the Lebor na hUidre (1912, Dublin: Hodges, Figgis, and Co.), edited by John Strachan and James George O'Keeffe, TBC-I 2981
      Mani thibreat, nícon díastar foraib co bráth.
      If [the Ulstermen] do not give [battle], they sg will never be avenged.
InflectionEdit

Further readingEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From to- +‎ fichid.

VerbEdit

do·fich (verbal noun togal)

  1. to conquer, take by storm
InflectionEdit

Further readingEdit

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
do·fich do·ḟich do·fich
pronounced with /-v(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.