EnglishEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

Perhaps from Latin dorsum (the back), i.e. what one lies on when sleeping; perhaps from English dialect doss (a hassock).

VerbEdit

doss (third-person singular simple present dosses, present participle dossing, simple past and past participle dossed)

  1. (intransitive, Britain and Ireland) To avoid work, shirk, etc.
    I am going to doss tomorrow when the match is on.
  2. (intransitive, Britain, slang) To sleep in the open or in a derelict building because one is homeless
    I normally have to doss in shop doorways or park benches.

NounEdit

doss (countable and uncountable, plural dosses)

  1. (slang, Britain and Ireland) The avoidance of work.
    I am going to have a doss tomorrow.
  2. (slang, Britain and Ireland) An easy piece of work.
    Circumnavigating the world in a canoe is no doss.
  3. (slang, dated, Britain and Ireland) A place to sleep in; a bed.
  4. (slang, dated, Britain and Ireland, by extension) Sleep.

AdjectiveEdit

doss (not comparable)

  1. (Scotland) Useless or lazy. Generally combined with expletive noun, especially cunt.
    Get a hauld o yersel, ye doss cunt!
  2. (Scotland) Good, desirable.
    The place is pure doss, like.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit