See also: droch-

Old IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Celtic *drukos (compare Welsh drwg).

AdjectiveEdit

droch

  1. bad, evil
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 134d3
      Ɔ·riris-siu .i. ar·troídfe{a}-siu inna droch daíni, a Dǽ, dia n-anduch, air is fechtnach a n-andach mani erthroítar húa Día.
      You will bind, i.e. you will restrain the evil men, O God, from their iniquity, for their iniquity is prosperous if they are not restrained by God.
    • c. 845, St. Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 217a
      Memmbrum naue, droch dub! Ó, ní epur na haill.
      New parchment, bad ink! Oh, I say nothing more.

Usage notesEdit

Forms a compound with a following noun and is thus never inflected on its own.

DescendantsEdit

  • Irish: droch-, droch
  • Manx: drogh
  • Scottish Gaelic: droch

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Celtic *drokos, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰregʰ-. Cognate with Ancient Greek τρέχω (trékhō, I run), τροχός (trokhós, wheel, grindstone), Breton troc'h (cut).

NounEdit

droch m (genitive unattested)

  1. wheel
    Synonym: roth
  2. circlet
InflectionEdit
Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative droch drochL *droichL
Vocative *droich drochL drochuH
Accusative drochN drochL drochuH
Genitive *droichL droch drochN
Dative drochL drochaib drochaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization
Related termsEdit

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
droch droch
pronounced with /ð(ʲ)-/
ndroch
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish droch (bad), from Proto-Celtic *drukos.

AdjectiveEdit

droch (comparative miosa)

  1. bad

Usage notesEdit

  • Unlike the majority of Scottish Gaelic adjectives, droch precedes the noun and lenites it.
  • Cannot be used on its own (without a noun).
  • Often prefixed to words to indicate a malignant subject, similarly to English ill-, as seen in Derived terms below.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

droch

  1. Soft mutation of troch.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
troch droch nhroch throch
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.