See also: ölç

Contents

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish olc, from Proto-Celtic *ulkʷos.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

olc m ‎(genitive singular oilc, nominative plural oilc)

  1. evil
  2. bad (in the world; of people, things)
  3. misfortune

DeclensionEdit

AdjectiveEdit

olc ‎(genitive singular masculine oilc, genitive singular feminine oilce, plural olca, comparative measa)

  1. bad, evil
  2. unfortunate
  3. wicked

Usage notesEdit

Takes the adverbial construction go holc when used predicatively after a form of :

  • Bhí a mháthair go holc.
    His mother was wicked.

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
olc n-olc holc unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *ulkʷos, of uncertain etymology. May be related to Latin ulcus (English ulcer). Alternatively, it may be from Proto-Indo-European *wĺ̥kʷos(wolf), although there are considerable phonological and semantic difficulties with this etymology.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

olc ‎(comparative messa)

  1. bad, evil

DescendantsEdit

  • Irish: olc
  • Scottish Gaelic: olc

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
olc unchanged n-olc
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish olc, from Proto-Celtic *ulkʷos.

NounEdit

olc m ‎(genitive uilc)

  1. evil, wickedness
  2. harm, hurt
  3. infamy, mischief, wrongdoing

AdjectiveEdit

olc ‎(comparative miosa)

  1. evil, wicked, bad
  2. infamous, untoward, reprobate

SynonymsEdit