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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /tɹɒɡ/
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

Short for troglodyte.

NounEdit

trog (plural trogs)

  1. (slang, Britain) A hooligan, lout.
    • 1984, Martin Amis, Money, Vintage 2005, p. 253:
      ‘I'm sharing a cell with a couple of trogs who make you look like the swan of Avon.’

Etymology 2Edit

Origin unknown.

VerbEdit

trog (third-person singular simple present trogs, present participle trogging, simple past and past participle trogged)

  1. (slang) To walk laboriously; to trudge.
    • 2015, David Mitchell, Slade House:
      So down Westwood Road I trogged, looking left, looking right, searching high and low for Slade Alley.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch trog.

NounEdit

trog (plural trôe)

  1. trough

DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch troch, from Old Dutch *trog, from Proto-Germanic *trugą, *trugaz (compare West Frisian trôch, English trough, German Trog, Swedish tråg), from Proto-Indo-European *dru-kó (compare Middle Irish drochta (wooden basin), Old Armenian տարգալ (targal, ladle, spoon)), enlargement of *dóru (tree).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trog m (plural troggen, diminutive trogje n)

  1. trough
  2. (geology) trench

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

VerbEdit

trog

  1. First-person singular preterite of trügen.
  2. Third-person singular preterite of trügen.

IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trog n (genitive singular trogs, nominative plural trog)

  1. trough

DeclensionEdit

AnagramsEdit


ManxEdit

VerbEdit

trog (verbal noun troggal, past participle troggit)

  1. to lift, raise, hoist, raise up, elevate, heave (as shoulders), boost
  2. to gather up
  3. to rig up, construct, build
  4. to elaborate
  5. to input
  6. to take
  7. to invoke
  8. to wind, winch
  9. to put up
  10. to breed
  11. to rear, nurture, train (as child)
  12. to arise
  13. to pull in
  14. to set in rows
  15. to sing up
  16. to harvest
  17. to rally
  18. to pick up
  19. to freshen (of wind)
  20. to contract (as disease)
  21. to pick off

MutationEdit

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
trog hrog drog
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Derived termsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *trugaz. Related to Dutch trog, German Trog, Icelandic trog.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trog m

  1. trough
    Þā swīn ǣton of þām troge.
    The pigs ate from the trough.

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: trogh