EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English edycte, borrowed from Latin edictum; earlier form edit, from Old French edit, from the same Latin word.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈiː.dɪkt/
  • (file)

NounEdit

edict (plural edicts)

  1. A proclamation of law or other authoritative command.
    • 2018 June 18, Phil McNulty, “Tunisia 1 – 2 England”, in BBC Sport[1], archived from the original on 21 April 2019:
      It was made clear in a pre-tournament referees' briefing that such grappling would be taken seriously and punished, so England have every right to ask why this edict was not carried out.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch edict, from Latin ēdictum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

edict n (plural edicten, diminutive edictje n)

  1. edict

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: edik

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin edictum

NounEdit

edict n (plural edicte)

  1. edict

DeclensionEdit