edictum

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From ēdīcō (I declare, announce, decree), from ex (out of, from) + dīcō (say, affirm, tell).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ēdictum n (genitive ēdictī); second declension

  1. A proclamation, ordinance, edict, decree or manifesto by a magistrate.
  2. The public announcement of the praetor or other senior magistrate, in which he states, on entering upon his office, the rules by which he will be guided in administering justice; inaugural address.
  3. (by extension) An order, command, edict.

InflectionEdit

Second declension neuter.

Number Singular Plural
nominative ēdictum ēdicta
genitive ēdictī ēdictōrum
dative ēdictō ēdictīs
accusative ēdictum ēdicta
ablative ēdictō ēdictīs
vocative ēdictum ēdicta

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Catalan: edicte
  • English: edict
  • French: édit
  • German: Edikt
  • Greek: έδικτο (édikto)
    • Byzantine Greek: ἔδικτον

ReferencesEdit

  • edictum in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879
Last modified on 7 April 2014, at 23:15