EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English elat, elate, from Latin ēlātus (exalted, lofty), perfect passive participle of efferō (bring forth or out; raise; exalt), from ē (out of) (short form of ex) + ferō (carry, bear).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈleɪt/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪt

VerbEdit

elate (third-person singular simple present elates, present participle elating, simple past and past participle elated)

  1. (transitive) To make joyful or proud.
  2. (transitive) To lift up; raise; elevate.

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

elate

  1. elated; exultant
    • 1714, Alexander Pope, “The Rape of the Lock”, in The Works of Mr. Alexander Pope, volume I, London: [] W[illiam] Bowyer, for Bernard Lintot, [], published 1717, OCLC 43265629, canto III:
      Oh thoughtless Mortals! ever blind to Fate,
      Too soon dejected, and dejected, and too soon elate.
    • 1895, Helen Hunt Jackson, The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine, Volume 28
      Our nineteenth century is wonderfully set up in its own esteem, wonderfully elate at its progress.
  2. (obsolete) Lifted up; raised; elevated.
    • c. 1707, Elijah Fenton, a letter to the Knight of the Sable Shield
      with upper lip elate
    • a. 1794, William Jones, an ode in imitation of Alcaeus
      And sovereign law, that State's collected will, / O'er thrones and globes, elate, / Sits empress, crowning good, repressing ill.

QuotationsEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


EstonianEdit

VerbEdit

elate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of elama

LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From ēlātus (exalted, lofty), perfect passive participle of efferō (bring forth or out; raise; exalt), from ē (out of), short form of ex, + ferō (carry, bear).

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

ēlātē (comparative ēlātus or ēlātius, no superlative)

  1. loftily, proudly
    • c. 177, Gellius: Noctes Atticae, Book 9, Chapter 15, Verse 4
      Introit adulescens et praefatur arrogantius et elatius, quam aetati eius decebat, ac deinde iubet exponi controversias.
      The young fellow entered the room, made some preliminary remarks in a more arrogant and presumptuous style than became his years, and then asked that subjects for debate be given him.
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek ἐλάτη (elátē).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

elatē f (genitive elatēs); first declension

  1. A sort of fir
  2. The leaf of the palm bud
DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun (Greek-type).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative elatē elatae
Genitive elatēs elatārum
Dative elatae elatīs
Accusative elatēn elatās
Ablative elatē elatīs
Vocative elatē elatae

ReferencesEdit

  • elate in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • elate in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • elate in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Middle EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

elate

  1. Alternative form of elat