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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From a Cornish word,[3] perhaps Cornish elven, elvan (spark)[4][5] because the hard rock could be struck to spark fire.[6]

AdjectiveEdit

elvan (comparative more elvan, superlative most elvan)

  1. (mining) Of or relating to certain veins of feldspathic or porphyritic rock crossing metalliferous veins in the mining districts of Cornwall.
    an elvan course

NounEdit

elvan (plural elvans)

  1. (mining) The rock of an elvan vein, or the vein itself.
    Synonym: elvanite (the rock)

Etymology 2Edit

Variation of elven (or elfin,[3] which see for more) influenced by -an.

AdjectiveEdit

elvan (comparative more elvan, superlative most elvan)

  1. (uncommon) Elven, elfin, pertaining to elves.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ James Stormonth, Etymological and Pronouncing Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition, William Blackwood and Sons (1879), page 174, under the entry “elf”: “'elvan, a. ĕlv'-ăn, same as elfish
  2. ^ elvan” in the Collins English Dictionary
  3. 3.0 3.1 elvan in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911
  4. ^ Thomas Davidson, Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary of the English Language (1907)
  5. ^ Handbook for travellers in Cornwall (1879), John Murray (publishers), page 25
  6. ^ Frederick William Pearce Jago, An English-Cornish Dictionary: Compiled from the Best Sources (1887), entry "STONE": "A very hard stone which will strike fire is called elvan. Borlase says elven means a spark of fire."

AnagramsEdit


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

elvan

  1. definite singular of elva