See also: Rock and röck

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English rocke, rokke (rock formation), from Old English *rocc (rock), as in Old English stānrocc (high stone rock, peak, obelisk), and also later from Anglo-Norman roc, roce, roque (compare Modern French roc, roche, rocher), from Medieval Latin rocca (attested 767), from Vulgar Latin *rocca, of uncertain origin, sometimes said to be of Celtic (in particular, perhaps Gaulish [Term?]) origin (compare Breton roc'h).[1]

NounEdit

rock (countable and uncountable, plural rocks)

 
Solid mineral aggregate.
 
A boulder.
 
A yellow diamond.
 
Several rocks of crack cocaine.
  1. A formation of minerals, specifically:
    1. (uncountable) The naturally occurring aggregate of solid mineral matter that constitutes a significant part of the earth's crust.
      • 2013 June 29, “High and wet”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8842, page 28:
        Floods in northern India, mostly in the small state of Uttarakhand, have wrought disaster on an enormous scale. [] Rock-filled torrents smashed vehicles and homes, burying victims under rubble and sludge.
      The face of the cliff is solid rock.
    2. A mass of stone projecting out of the ground or water.
      The ship crashed on the rocks.
    3. (chiefly British) A boulder or large stone; or (US, Canada) a smaller stone; a pebble.
      Some fool has thrown a rock through my window.
    4. (geology) Any natural material with a distinctive composition of minerals.
    5. (slang) A precious stone or gem, especially a diamond.
      Look at the size of that rock on her finger!
  2. A large hill or island having no vegetation.
    Pearl Rock near Cape Cod is so named because the morning sun makes it gleam like a pearl.
  3. (figuratively) Something that is strong, stable, and dependable; a person who provides security or support to another.
    • 1611, King James Bible, Matthew 16:18,
      And I say also unto thee, That thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church; and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.
    • 1991, Robert Harling and Andrew Bergman, Soapdish, Paramount Pictures,
      Celeste Talbert: She is my rock, my right hand.
  4. A lump or cube of ice.
    I'll have a whisky on the rocks, please.
  5. (Britain, uncountable) A type of confectionery made from sugar in the shape of a stick, traditionally having some text running through its length.
    While we're in Brighton, let's get a stick of rock!
  6. (US, slang) A crystallized lump of crack cocaine.
    Synonyms: crack rock, candy
    • 1995, “Dear Mama”, in Me Against the World, performed by 2Pac:
      I ain't guilty, ‘cause even though I sell rocks / It feels good puttin' money in your mailbox
    • 2014, Russell Brand, “Prologue”, in Revolution, →ISBN, page xiii:
      When I necked five-quid bottles of vodka, I did not read the label. When I scored rocks and bags off tumbleweed hobos blowing through the no-man's-land of Hackney estates, I conducted no litmus test.
  7. (US, slang) An unintelligent person, especially one who repeats mistakes.
  8. (South Africa, slang, derogatory) An Afrikaner.
  9. (US poker slang) An extremely conservative player who is willing to play only the very strongest hands.
  10. Any of several fish:
    1. The striped bass.
    2. The huss or rock salmon.
      We ordered rock and chips to take away.
  11. (US, basketball, slang) A basketball.
    Yo homie, pass the rock!
    • 2021 July 14, A. A. Dowd, “Space Jam: A New Legacy is one big, witless commercial for Warner Bros. properties”, in The A.V. Club[1]:
      It [the original Space Jam limped to 88 minutes with detours into Jordan’s swanky mansion and forced its cartoon cavalry to compete for screen time against Wayne Knight and a bunch of basketball players who delivered their lines much less confidently than they put the rock through the net.
  12. (US, baseball, slang) A mistake.
    • 2014, Joe Morgan, ‎Richard Lally, Baseball For Dummies (page 227)
      Now, you should never make the last out of an inning at third, and when a player does it, everyone knows he pulled a rock.
  13. (rock paper scissors) A closed hand (a handshape resembling a rock), that beats scissors and loses to paper. It beats lizard and loses to Spock in rock-paper-scissors-lizard-Spock.
  14. (informal, cricket) A cricket ball, especially a new one that has not been softened by use
  15. (CB radio slang) A crystal used to control the radio frequency.
    • 1980, Joseph J. Carr, The Complete Handbook of Radio Receivers (page 199)
      It was easily possible to double the cost of a CB rig just by adding all of the "rocks" necessary to do the job.
SynonymsEdit
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Terms derived from rock (etymology 1)
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “rock”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English rokken, from Old English roccian, from Proto-Germanic *rukkōną (compare obsolete Dutch rokken, Middle High German rocken (to drag, jerk), Modern German rücken (to move, shift), Icelandic rukka (to yank)), from Proto-Germanic *rugnōną, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ruk-néh₂, from *h₃runk- (compare Latin runcāre (to weed), Latvian rũķēt (to toss, dig)).

VerbEdit

rock (third-person singular simple present rocks, present participle rocking, simple past and past participle rocked)

  1. (transitive and intransitive) To move gently back and forth.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 12, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      To Edward […] he was terrible, nerve-inflaming, poisonously asphyxiating. He sat rocking himself in the late Mr. Churchill's swing chair, smoking and twaddling.
    Rock the baby to sleep.
    The empty swing rocked back and forth in the wind.
  2. (transitive) To cause to shake or sway violently.
    Don't rock the boat.
  3. (intransitive) To sway or tilt violently back and forth.
    The boat rocked at anchor.
  4. (transitive and intransitive, of ore etc.) To be washed and panned in a cradle or in a rocker.
    The ores had been rocked and laid out for inspection.
  5. (transitive) To disturb the emotional equilibrium of; to distress; to greatly impact (most often positively).
    Downing Street has been rocked by yet another sex scandal.
    She rocked my world.
  6. (intransitive) To do well or to be operating at high efficiency.
    • 2012 April 24, Phil Dawkes, “Barcelona 2-2 Chelsea”, in BBC Sport:
      The Blues' challenge had been rocking at that point, with Terry's centre-back partner Gary Cahill lost to injury and Barca having just levelled the tie through Busquets's neat, close-range finish from Isaac Cuenca's pull-back.
  7. (slang, transitive, euphemistic) to make love to or have sex with.
    • 1973, Noddy Holder, Jim Lea (lyrics and music), “Cum On Feel the Noize”, performed by Slade:
      Cum on feel the noize, girls, rock your boys.
    • 1974, Andy Kim (lyrics and music), “Rock Me Gently”:
      Rock me gently, rock me slowly, take it easy, don't you know, that I have never been loved like this before.
    • 1974, Harry Wayne Casey, Richard Finch (lyrics and music), “Rock Your Baby”, performed by George McCrae:
      Open up your heart / And let the loving start / Oh, woman, take me in your arms / Rock your baby.
    • 1980, Jonah Ellis, Alisa Peoples, Cavin Yarbrough (lyrics and music), “Don't Stop the Music”, in The Two of Us, performed by Yarbrough and Peoples:
      I just wanna rock you, all night long.
  8. (intransitive) To sway one's body as a stim.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Terms derived from rock (etymology 2)
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

NounEdit

rock (plural rocks)

  1. An act of rocking; a rocking motion; a sway.
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
  • Etymology 3Edit

    Shortened from rock and roll. Since the meaning of rock has adapted to mean a simpler, more modern, metal-like genre, rock and roll has generally been left referring to earlier forms such as that of the 1950s, notably more swing-oriented style.

    NounEdit

    rock (uncountable)

    1. A style of music characterized by basic drum-beat, generally 4/4 riffs, based on (usually electric) guitar, bass guitar, drums, and vocals.
    HyponymsEdit
  • Derived termsEdit
    TranslationsEdit

    VerbEdit

    rock (third-person singular simple present rocks, present participle rocking, simple past and past participle rocked)

    1. (intransitive) To play, perform, or enjoy rock music, especially with a lot of skill or energy.
      Let’s rock!
    2. (intransitive, slang) To be very favourable or skilful; excel; be fantastic.
      Chocolate rocks.
      My holidays in Ibiza rocked! I can't wait to go back.
    3. (transitive) to thrill or excite, especially with rock music
      Let's rock this joint!
    4. (transitive) to do something with excitement yet skillfully
      I need to rock a piss.
    5. (transitive) To wear (a piece of clothing, outfit etc.) successfully or with style; to carry off (a particular look, style).
      • 2011, Tim Jonze, The Guardian, 29 Apr 2011:
        Take today, where she's rocking that well-known fashion combo – a Tory Burch outfit offset with a whacking great bruise attained by smacking her head on a plane's overhead lockers.
      • 2012 May 8, “Rhianna dazzles at the Met Gala”, in The Sun newspaper[2]:
        Rihanna was the pick of the best bunch, rocking a black backless crocodile dress from Tom Ford’s Autumn 2012 collection
    SynonymsEdit
    • (be very favourable or skilful): rule
    AntonymsEdit
    • (be very favourable or skilful): stink, suck (the latter may be perceived as vulgar)
    Related termsEdit
    TranslationsEdit

    Etymology 4Edit

    From Middle English rok, rocke, rokke, perhaps from Middle Dutch rocke (whence Dutch rokken), Middle Low German rocken, or Old Norse rokkr (whence Icelandic / Faroese rokkur, Danish rok, Swedish spinnrock (spinning wheel)). Cognate with Old High German rocko (distaff).

    NounEdit

    rock (countable and uncountable, plural rocks)

    1. (countable) Distaff.
      • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. [], London: [] [John Wolfe] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 960102938, book IV, canto II, stanza 48:
        Sad Clotho held the rocke, the whiles the thread / By grisly Lachesis was spun with pain, / That cruel Atropos eftsoon undid.
      • 1899, T Frank Waters, The Development of Our Town Government:
        By order of the General Court in 1642, the "prudentiall" men of each town were instructed "to take care of such [children] as are sett to keep cattle be set to some other employment withal, as spinning upon the rock, knitting, weaving tape, etc., and that boys and girls be not suffered to converse together so as may occasion any wanton, dishonest or immodest behavior.
      • 1902, Day Otis Kellogg, ‎Thomas Spencer Baynes, ‎William Robertson Smith, The Encyclopaedia Britannica, page 664:
        A prepared end of yarn being fixed into the notch, the spinster, by a smart rolling motion of the spindle with the right hand against the right leg, threw it out from her, spinning in the air, while, with the left hand, she drew from the rock an additional supply of fibre which was formed into a uniform and equal strand with the right.
      • 1920, John Horner, The Linen Trade of Europe During the Spinning-wheel Period, page 32:
        It is true that in Ireland, even in recent years, the flax, before being placed on the rock or distaff, was tangled into a mass, or, as Cormmelin expresses it, “drawn out in a flat cake.”
    2. (uncountable) The flax or wool on a distaff.
    SynonymsEdit
    TranslationsEdit

    Etymology 5Edit

    NounEdit

    rock (plural rocks)

    1. Archaic form of roc (mythical bird)

    AnagramsEdit


    CatalanEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    From English rock.

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    rock m (uncountable)

    1. rock, rock music

    Further readingEdit


    CzechEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    From English rock.

    NounEdit

    rock m

    1. rock (style of music)

    Derived termsEdit


    DutchEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    From English rock.

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    rock m (uncountable)

    1. rock (style of music)

    FinnishEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    Unadapted borrowing from English rock.

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    rock

    1. rock (style of music)

    DeclensionEdit

    Inflection of rock (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
    nominative rock rockit
    genitive rockin rockien
    partitive rockia rockeja
    illative rockiin rockeihin
    singular plural
    nominative rock rockit
    accusative nom. rock rockit
    gen. rockin
    genitive rockin rockien
    partitive rockia rockeja
    inessive rockissa rockeissa
    elative rockista rockeista
    illative rockiin rockeihin
    adessive rockilla rockeilla
    ablative rockilta rockeilta
    allative rockille rockeille
    essive rockina rockeina
    translative rockiksi rockeiksi
    instructive rockein
    abessive rockitta rockeitta
    comitative rockeineen
    Possessive forms of rock (type risti)
    possessor singular plural
    1st person rockini rockimme
    2nd person rockisi rockinne
    3rd person rockinsa

    SynonymsEdit

    Derived termsEdit

    CompoundsEdit


    FrenchEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    Borrowed from English rock.

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    rock m (uncountable)

    1. rock (style of music)

    Derived termsEdit

    Further readingEdit


    HungarianEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    From English rock.

    PronunciationEdit

    • IPA(key): [ˈrokː]
    • Hyphenation: rock

    NounEdit

    rock (plural rockok)

    1. (music) rock (style of music)
      Synonym: rockzene

    DeclensionEdit

    Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
    singular plural
    nominative rock rockok
    accusative rockot rockokat
    dative rocknak rockoknak
    instrumental rockkal rockokkal
    causal-final rockért rockokért
    translative rockká rockokká
    terminative rockig rockokig
    essive-formal rockként rockokként
    essive-modal
    inessive rockban rockokban
    superessive rockon rockokon
    adessive rocknál rockoknál
    illative rockba rockokba
    sublative rockra rockokra
    allative rockhoz rockokhoz
    elative rockból rockokból
    delative rockról rockokról
    ablative rocktól rockoktól
    non-attributive
    possessive - singular
    rocké rockoké
    non-attributive
    possessive - plural
    rockéi rockokéi
    Possessive forms of rock
    possessor single possession multiple possessions
    1st person sing. rockom rockjaim
    2nd person sing. rockod rockjaid
    3rd person sing. rockja rockjai
    1st person plural rockunk rockjaink
    2nd person plural rockotok rockjaitok
    3rd person plural rockjuk rockjaik

    Derived termsEdit

    Compound words
    Expressions

    Related termsEdit


    ItalianEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    From English rock.

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    rock m (uncountable)

    1. rock (style of music)

    Further readingEdit

    • rock in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

    PolishEdit

     
    Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
    Wikipedia pl

    EtymologyEdit

    From English rock.

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    rock m inan

    1. rock (style of music)

    DeclensionEdit

    Derived termsEdit

    Related termsEdit

    Further readingEdit

    • rock in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
    • rock in Polish dictionaries at PWN

    PortugueseEdit

     
    Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
    Wikipedia pt

    Alternative formsEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    Unadapted borrowing from English rock.

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    rock m (uncountable)

    1. rock (style of music)
      Synonym: rock and roll

    Derived termsEdit


    SpanishEdit

     
    Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
    Wikipedia es

    EtymologyEdit

    Unadapted borrowing from English rock.

    PronunciationEdit

    NounEdit

    rock m (plural rocks)

    1. rock (music style)

    Derived termsEdit

    Related termsEdit

    Further readingEdit


    SwedishEdit

    PronunciationEdit

    Etymology 1Edit

    From Old Swedish rokker, from Middle Low German rock, from Old Saxon rok, from Proto-Germanic *rukkaz.

    NounEdit

    rock c

    1. a coat, an overcoat
    DeclensionEdit
    Declension of rock 
    Singular Plural
    Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
    Nominative rock rocken rockar rockarna
    Genitive rocks rockens rockars rockarnas

    SynonymsEdit

    Related termsEdit

    Etymology 2Edit

    Borrowed from English rock.

    NounEdit

    rock c (uncountable)

    1. (music, uncountable) rock, rock and roll
    DeclensionEdit
    Declension of rock 
    Uncountable
    Indefinite Definite
    Nominative rock rocken
    Genitive rocks rockens

    Related termsEdit

    ReferencesEdit