navel

Contents

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

A navel.

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English navel, navele, from Old English nafela, from Proto-Germanic *nabalô (compare West Frisian nâle, Dutch navel, German Nabel), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃nobʰilos (compare Irish imleac, Latin umbilicus, Ancient Greek ὀμφαλός ‎(omphalós)), diminutive of *h₃nobʰ- (compare English nave). More at nave.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

navel ‎(plural navels)

  1. (anatomy) The indentation or bump remaining in the abdomen of mammals where the umbilical cord was attached before birth.
  2. The central part or point of anything; the middle.
    • John Milton
      Within the navel of this hideous wood,
      Immured in cypress shades, a sorcerer dwells.
    • 2004, David Mitchell, Cloud Atlas
      We sat alfresco on the edge of a “square,” in reality a pond of cobbly mud with a plinth plonked in its navel []
  3. (historical) An eye on the underside of a carronade for securing it to a carriage.

SynonymsEdit

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DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch navele, navel, from Old Dutch *navalo, from Proto-Germanic *nabalô.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

navel m ‎(plural navels, diminutive naveltje n)

  1. navel

SwedishEdit

Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia sv

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse nafli.

NounEdit

navel c

  1. navel

DeclensionEdit

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