Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
A navel.

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English navel, navele, from Old English nafela, from Proto-Germanic *nabalô (compare West Frisian nâle, Dutch navel, German Nabel), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃nobʰilos (compare Irish imleac, Latin umbilicus, Ancient Greek ὀμφαλός (omphalós)), diminutive of *h₃nobʰ- (compare English nave). More at nave.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

navel (plural navels)

  1. (anatomy) The indentation or bump remaining in the abdomen of mammals where the umbilical cord was attached before birth.
  2. The central part or point of anything; the middle.
    • John Milton
      Within the navel of this hideous wood,
      Immured in cypress shades, a sorcerer dwells.
    • 2004, David Mitchell, Cloud Atlas
      We sat alfresco on the edge of a “square,” in reality a pond of cobbly mud with a plinth plonked in its navel []
  3. (historical) An eye on the underside of a carronade for securing it to a carriage.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch navele, navel, from Old Dutch *navalo, from Proto-Germanic *nabalô.

NounEdit

navel m (plural navels, diminutive naveltje n)

  1. navel

SwedishEdit

 
Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse nafli.

NounEdit

navel c

  1. navel

DeclensionEdit