employer

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French employeur; equivalent to employ +‎ -er.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 
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employer (plural employers)

  1. A person, firm or other entity which pays for or hires the services of another person.
    • 1897 December (indicated as 1898), Winston Churchill, chapter 10, in The Celebrity: An Episode, New York, N.Y.: The Macmillan Company; London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd., OCLC 222716698:
      The skipper Mr. Cooke had hired at Far Harbor was a God-fearing man with a luke warm interest in his new billet and employer, and had only been prevailed upon to take charge of the yacht after the offer of an emolument equal to half a year's sea pay of an ensign in the navy.
    • 1973, E. F. Schumacher, Small is Beautiful:
      the ideal from the point of view of the employer is to have output without employees, and the ideal from the point of view of the employee is to have income without employment.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French employer, from Old French emploier, emploiier, inherited from Latin implicāre, present active infinitive of implicō. Doublet of impliquer, a borrowing.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɑ̃.plwa.je/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

employer

  1. to employ

ConjugationEdit

This verb is part of a large group of -er verbs that conjugate like noyer or ennuyer. These verbs always replace the ‘y’ with an ‘i’ before a silent ‘e’.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French emploier, emploiier.

VerbEdit

employer

  1. to employ; to use; to make use of

ConjugationEdit

  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

DescendantsEdit

  • French: employer