emprise

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French emprise, emprinse, from Late Latin *imprensa, from Latin in- + prehendere ‎(to take).

NounEdit

emprise ‎(plural emprises)

  1. (archaic) An enterprise or endeavor, especially a quest or adventure.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.ix:
      noble minds of yore allyed were, / In braue poursuit of cheualrous emprize, / That none did others safety despize []
    • Longfellow
      the deeds of love and high emprise
    • 1900, William Archer, America To-Day, Observations & Reflections, page 181:
      Nothing short of an imperative sense of duty could tempt me to set forth on that most perilous emprise, a discussion of the American language.
  2. (archaic) The qualities which prompt one to undertake difficult and dangerous exploits; chivalric prowess.
    • Milton
      I love thy courage yet, and bold emprise; / But here thy sword can do thee little stead.

VerbEdit

emprise ‎(third-person singular simple present emprises, present participle emprising, simple past and past participle emprised)

  1. (obsolete) To undertake.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

emprise f ‎(plural emprises)

  1. expropriation
  2. domination, control, influence

External linksEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

emprise f ‎(oblique plural emprises, nominative singular emprise, nominative plural emprises)

  1. enterprise; undertaking; activity

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • (fr) Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (emprise)
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