See also: escalá and escală

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Occitan escala, from Latin scāla.

NounEdit

escala f (plural escales)

  1. stairs
  2. ladder
  3. (poker) straight
  4. scale, measure

Etymology 2Edit

Probably borrowed from Italian scala, in this sense taken from Byzantine Greek σκάλα (skála), itself from Latin scala.

NounEdit

escala f (plural escales)

  1. stopover

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin scāla. Cognate of escada (ladder, stairs).

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

NounEdit

escala f (plural escalas)

  1. scale, measure

PortugueseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin scāla. Cognate of escada (ladder, stairs).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

escala f (plural escalas)

  1. scale, measure

Etymology 2Edit

Probably borrowed from Italian scala, in this sense taken from Byzantine Greek σκάλα (skála), itself from Latin scala.

NounEdit

escala f (plural escalas)

  1. stopover

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

escala

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of escalar
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of escalar

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /esˈkala/, [esˈka.la]
  • Hyphenation: es‧ca‧la

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin scāla. Cognates include French échelle.

NounEdit

escala f (plural escalas)

  1. ladder (a frame, usually portable, of wood, metal, or rope, used for ascent and descent)
    Synonym: escalera de mano
  2. scale (an ordered, usually numerical sequence used for measurement, means of assigning a magnitude)
  3. (music) scale (a series of notes spanning an octave)
  4. ladder, hierarchy (of a company, of the military)
    Synonym: escalafón
  5. scale (the ratio of depicted distance to actual distance)
  6. scale (size; scope)
    a gran escalaon a broad scale
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Italian scala, in this sense taken from Byzantine Greek σκάλα (skála), itself from Latin scala.

NounEdit

escala f (plural escalas)

  1. stopover, layover (a short interruption in a journey or the place visited during such an interruption)

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

escala

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of escalar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of escalar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of escalar.

Further readingEdit