See also: Poker and póker

English edit

 
Miniature tongs, shovel and poker

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

poke +‎ -er

Noun edit

poker (plural pokers)

  1. A metal rod, generally of wrought iron, for adjusting the burning logs or coals in a fire; a firestick. [from earlier 16th c.]
    Synonyms: firestick, stoker, (obsolete) fire pike
  2. (historical) A tool like a soldering iron for making poker drawings.
  3. One who pokes.
    • 2012, Johnny Meah, Risk: No Eulogy for Tin Soldiers, page 40:
      The guy next to him poked him in the ribs and said, “Check out the bazongas on this one!” Lee pivoted toward the rib poker and found himself looking straight into the face of Romeo Bouchard.
  4. A kind of duck, the pochard.
  5. (MLE, slang) A knife.
    Synonyms: jook, jooker, ching, ying, bassy, rambo, pokey, chete, shank, nank, splash, splasher, cheffer, wetter
    • 2020 August 7, Kaygrab x D1 (lyrics and music), “Rapid”‎[1], 1:18–1:21:
      Key sense with the super-soaker
      Longest poker, leave man stressed like yoga
    • 2021 March 6, Mloose (BG) (lyrics and music), “Real As Hell”‎[2], 0:58–1:02:
      There is that guy that does with the pokings
      I step with my poker
      Play, cuz right, you might get folded
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Verb edit

poker (third-person singular simple present pokers, present participle pokering, simple past and past participle pokered)

  1. (transitive) To poke with a utensil such as a poker or needle.
    • 1796 July, “The Late Lord Chesterfield”, in The Aberdeen Magazine, volume 1, number 2, page 70:
      The King continued pokering the fire with his back to the door, and took no notice of Lord Chesterfield.
    • 1939, Norah Gourlie, A Winter with Finnish Lapps, page 68:
      The lids have very pleasant designs pokered on with a hot needle.
    • 1988, Robin Jenkins, Guests of War, page 246:
      When she was gone Bell was afflicted by a mood that had her moving round the room, holding on to the yellow curtain, standing over her girls, stroking the sails of the model yacht, opening the drawer and looking at the broken brooch, pokering the fire, and shifting the kettle's position on the hearth.

Further reading edit

Etymology 2 edit

American English, perhaps from first element of German Pochspiel, from German pochen, perhaps from French poque. First appeared in the 19th century.

Noun edit

poker

  1. Any of various card games in which, following each of one or more rounds of dealing or revealing cards, the players in sequence make tactical bets or drop out, the bets forming a pool to be taken either by the sole remaining player or, after all rounds and bets have been completed, by those remaining players who hold a superior hand according to a standard ranking of hand values for the game. [from earlier 19th c.]
  2. (poker) All the four cards of the same rank.
  3. (soccer, rare) [a player's] scoring four goals in one match
    Synonym: haul
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit
Descendants edit
Translations edit
See also edit
Poker hands in English · poker hands (layout · text)
         
high card pair two pair three of a kind straight
         
flush full house four of a kind straight flush royal flush

Verb edit

poker (third-person singular simple present pokers, present participle pokering, simple past and past participle pokered)

  1. To play poker.
    • 1929, West Virginia Wild Life, page 38:
      Then we went to Mead's and pokered until morning.
    • 1969, Emma Wilson Emery, Aunt Puss & Others: Old Days in the Piney Woods, page 94:
      Papa liked nothing better than a game of poker . His pokering habits caused Mama grave anxiety.
    • 1992, Vance H. Trimble, The Astonishing Mr. Scripps, page 56:
      "He ran with and pokered with us boys,” Bob Paine would recall fifty years later, “ the darndest, pepperyest, finest companion a fellow could ask.”
    • 2017, Elle Kennedy, Sarina Bowen, Stay:
      “Yeah,” Lemming mutters. “We're pokering, so shut the fuck up.” “I raise five,” Blake announces.

Further reading edit

Etymology 3 edit

Compare Danish pokker (the deuce, devil), and English puck.

Noun edit

poker (plural pokers)

  1. (US, colloquial) Any imagined frightful object, especially one supposed to haunt the darkness; a bugbear.[1]
    • 5 May 1784, Horace Walpole, letter to Hon. H. S. Conway:
      The very leaves on the horse-chesnuts [] cling to the bough as if old poker was coming to take them away.

References edit

Anagrams edit

Basque edit

Noun edit

poker

  1. belch

Czech edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English poker.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈpokr̩]
  • Hyphenation: po‧ker

Noun edit

poker m inan

  1. poker

Declension edit

Dutch edit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from English poker, perhaps from the first element of German Pochspiel, from German pochen, perhaps from French poque.

Noun edit

poker n (uncountable)

  1. poker (card game)

Etymology 2 edit

From poken +‎ -er.

Noun edit

poker m (plural pokers, diminutive pokertje n)

  1. somebody who pokes a fire

Etymology 3 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

poker

  1. inflection of pokeren:
    1. first-person singular present indicative
    2. imperative

Anagrams edit

French edit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English poker.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

poker m (plural pokers)

  1. (card games) poker

Further reading edit

Italian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English poker.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

poker m (invariable)

  1. (card games) poker
  2. (card games, poker) four of a kind
  3. (metonymically, uncountable) the act of playing poker
  4. (metonymically) a game of poker

Derived terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ poker in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Further reading edit

  • poker in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Polish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English poker.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

poker m inan

  1. poker
  2. straight flush
    poker królewskiroyal flush

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • poker in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • poker in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese edit

Pronunciation edit

 

  • Hyphenation: po‧ker

Noun edit

poker m (uncountable)

  1. Alternative spelling of pôquer

Quotations edit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:pôquer.

Serbo-Croatian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English poker.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /pǒker/
  • Hyphenation: po‧ker

Noun edit

pòker m (Cyrillic spelling по̀кер)

  1. poker (card game)

Declension edit

References edit

  • poker” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Slovene edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pọ́kər m inan

  1. poker (card game)
  2. (poker) four of a kind

See also edit

Poker hands in Slovene · poker karte (layout · text)
         
najvišja karta par dva para tris lestvica, kenta
         
barva full house poker barvna lestvica kraljeva lestvica

Turkish edit

 
Turkish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia tr

Etymology edit

From Ottoman Turkishپوكر(poker), from English poker.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpo.cæɾ/, /ˈpo.cɛɾ/
  • Hyphenation: po‧ker

Noun edit

poker (definite accusative pokeri, plural pokerler)

  1. poker

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit