exquisite

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin exquīsītus, perfect passive participle of exquīrō (seek out).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɪkˈskwɪzɪt/, /ˈɛkskwɪzɪt/

AdjectiveEdit

exquisite (comparative more exquisite, superlative most exquisite)

  1. Especially fine or pleasing; exceptional.
    They sell good coffee and pastries, but their chocolate is exquisite.
    Sourav Ganguly scored an exquisite century in his debut Test match.
    • 1907 August, Robert W[illiam] Chambers, chapter I, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326:
      Selwyn, sitting up rumpled and cross-legged on the floor, after having boloed Drina to everybody's exquisite satisfaction, looked around at the sudden rustle of skirts to catch a glimpse of a vanishing figure—a glimmer of ruddy hair and the white curve of a youthful face, half-buried in a muff.
  2. (obsolete) Carefully adjusted; precise; accurate; exact.
  3. Recherché; far-fetched; abstruse.
  4. Of special beauty or rare excellence.
  5. Exceeding; extreme; keen, in a bad or a good sense.
    exquisite pain or pleasure
  6. Of delicate perception or close and accurate discrimination; not easy to satisfy; exact; fastidious.
    exquisite judgment, taste, or discernment
    • 1655, Thomas Fuller, James Nichols, editor, The Church History of Britain, [], volume (please specify |volume=I to III), new edition, London: [] [James Nichols] for Thomas Tegg and Son, [], published 1837, OCLC 913056315:
      his books of Oriental languages, wherein he was exquisite

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

exquisite (plural exquisites)

  1. (rare) Fop, dandy. [from early 20th c.]
    • 1849, Alexander Mackay, The western world; or, travels in the United States in 1846-87 (page 93)
      It is impossible to meet with a more finished coxcomb than a Broadway exquisite, or a “Broadway swell,” which is the designation attached to him on the spot.
    • 1925, P. G. Wodehouse, Sam the Sudden, Random House, London:2007, p. 42.
      So striking was his appearance that two exquisites, emerging from the Savoy Hotel and pausing on the pavement to wait for a vacant taxi, eyed him with pained disapproval as he approached, and then, starting, stared in amazement.
      'Good Lord!' said the first exquisite.

TranslationsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

exquisite

  1. inflection of exquisit:
    1. strong/mixed nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. strong nominative/accusative plural
    3. weak nominative all-gender singular
    4. weak accusative feminine/neuter singular

LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

exquīsīte

  1. vocative masculine singular of exquīsītus

ReferencesEdit

  • exquisite”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers