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English

Etymology

From Middle English bewteful, beautefull (attractive to the eye, beautiful), equivalent to beauty +‎ -ful. Displaced earlier sheen (from Middle English schene (beautiful), from Old English scīene (beautiful)), Middle English wliti (beautiful), from Old English wlitiġ (beautiful).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: byo͞oʹtĭ-fəl, IPA(key): [ˈbjuːtɪfəɫ]
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈbjut̬ɪfəɫ/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: beau‧ti‧ful

Adjective

beautiful (comparative more beautiful, superlative most beautiful)

  1. Attractive and possessing beauty.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 5, in The China Governess[1]:
      It's rather like a beautiful Inverness cloak one has inherited. Much too good to hide away, so one wears it instead of an overcoat and pretends it's an amusing new fashion.
    • 2016, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      It is a beautiful kitchen! — It is beautiful.
      (file)
    Anyone who has ever met her thought she was absolutely beautiful.
    There's a beautiful lake by the town.
  2. (of the weather) Pleasant; clear.
    It's beautiful outside, let's go for a walk.
  3. Well executed.
    The skater performed a beautiful axel.

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